Champs-Elysees killer described as unstable criminal who ‘hated police’

PARIS, France (AFP) — The Champs-Elysees shooter fits a pattern of many extremists inspired by Islamic State in France in recent years: a violent, unstable criminal not known for any religious conviction.

Karim Cheurfi, 39, was described as an oddball by his neighbors in the multi-ethnic suburb of Chelles east of Paris, about a 30-minute train ride from the center of the City of Light.

“Everyone knew him here,” said one resident in the quiet area where Cheurfi lived with his mother. “It was someone who had lost all reason, who was psychologically very damaged,” said the resident, asking not to be named.

Another local man, Salim, described him as “nuts” and someone never seen at the local mosque, while fellow resident Abdel said Cheurfi had been influenced by his repeated experiences in prison.

This photo provided by the AP on the condition that its source not be revealed, shows Karim Cheurfi. Police have searched a home in a suburb east of Paris believed linked to the attack on police on the Champs-Elysees. (AP Photo)

“He hated the police and France,” 23-year-old Abdel said, yet he found it hard to believe he was linked to the Islamic State group, which claimed the attack a few hours after the shooting on Thursday evening.

Salim, who said he knew Cheurfi’s cousin, said the gunman “could hardly use a remote controller for the television. Go on the internet and contact esh (Islamic State)? I can’t see it.”

After shooting a policeman dead with an automatic weapon and injuring two others on Thursday night, Cheurfi was killed in return fire. A hand-written note praising IS was found near his body.

Serial offender

Cheurfi had a long criminal record that dates back to at least 2001 when he was involved in an accident southeast of Paris while driving a stolen car.

After being pursued by a police officer and his brother, he seriously wounded the two men after shooting with a revolver he was carrying.

A soldier stands guard near the Arc of Triomphe at the top of the Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris, after a fatal shooting on April 20, 2017. (AP/Kamil Zihnioglu)

Two days later, after being arrested, he grabbed the gun of a policeman while in custody and tried to kill him.

He received a 20-year jail term on three counts of attempted murder, reduced to 15 years on appeal in February 2005, but was released early from prison in 2013.

Three months later, he committed a violent robbery which culminated in another car chase with police.

In July 2014, he was sentenced to four years in prison, but the last two years were suspended. He was released in 2015.

“At the time there was no sign he had been radicalized,” his lawyer, Jean-Laurent Panier, said. “It was someone very solitary and introverted. He talked very little, didn’t even defend himself.”

A police source told AFP that after he was released in 2015, he slipped under the radar. “We had a few things on him, but nothing massive,” said the source, asking not to be named.

This changed in February of this year when he was arrested again, this time on suspicion of wanting to attack security forces. He was released the next day for lack of evidence.

Since March he was the subject of an investigation by French anti-terror police but had not been flagged as an “S-File” by the security forces — the term used for extremists.

French municipal policemen observe a minute of silence on April 21, 2017 in the courtyard of the town hall in Bordeaux, southwestern France, to pay tribute to the police officer who was shot dead by an attacker on the Champs-Elysees the day before in Paris. (Mehdi Fedouach/AFP)

There are an estimated 10,000 people flagged as Islamic extremists in France and security forces say their resources enable them to monitor and mount surveillance of only a limited number.

On Tuesday, police arrested two men in the southern port city of Marseille with an arsenal of weapons and explosives.

The suspects, who met in prison and are suspected Islamic extremists, are thought to have been preparing an attack to disrupt France’s two-stage presidential election which gets underway this Sunday.

French authorities claim they have thwarted on average one plot every month since December 2015 when a wave of Islamist-inspired violence began.

In January 2015, gunmen targeted the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine and Jewish shoppers at a kosher supermarket, followed months later by atrocities around Paris including at the Bataclan concert hall in November of the same year.

In July 2016, a self-radicalized extremist drove a truck through crowds watching fireworks in the southern city of Nice, killing 86.

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Police: Fresno triple killer motivated by hate, not terrorism

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — A man wanted in the slaying of a motel security guard set out to kill as many white people as he could, gunning down three men on the streets of downtown Fresno before he was captured and admitted to the killings, the city’s police chief said Tuesday.

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer said Kori Ali Muhammad, 39, was motivated by hate and was not connected to extremism, even though he said “Allahu akbar” (God is great, in Arabic) during his arrest.

“This is solely based on race, and it had nothing to do with terrorism in spite of the statement he made,” Dyer said at a news conference.

Muhammad, who is black, fired 16 rounds in one minute at four places within a block, shooting men who appeared to be going about their day, authorities say.

He walked up to a utility truck and shot a Pacific Gas & Electric Co. employee sitting in the passenger seat, authorities say. The driver of the truck, who is Latino, sped off to the police department for help, but the worker, a 34-year-old white man, died.

This undated photo provided by the Fresno Police Department shows Kori Ali Muhammad, 39, who was arrested shortly after a shooting rampage outside a Catholic Charities building, in Fresno, Calif, on Tuesday, April 18, 2017. (Fresno Police Department via AP)

Muhammad then shot at another person and missed. He aimed at a third, killing the 37-year-old on the sidewalk as he walked with a bag of groceries in a neighborhood lined with tall trees, authorities say. The final victim, 58, was gunned down in the parking lot of a charity building.

Dyer said Muhammad approached a vehicle in between shootings, but he spared the lives of two women who were in the car with a child. The women were Latina, he said.

“These individuals who were chosen today did not do anything to deserve what they got,” he said earlier in the day. “These were unprovoked attacks by an individual that was intent on carrying out homicides today. He did that.”

Police had put out a news release hours before the shootings Tuesday, saying that Muhammad was armed and dangerous and wanted in the shooting death of a security guard at a Motel 6 last week. The guard, 25-year-old Carl Williams, was white.

Muhammad told officers at his arrest that he was the guy they were looking for, Dyer said.

“I did it. I shot them,” Dyer said Muhammad told officers.

Police are searching for the revolver he said he tossed into a pile of clothing. The gun may have been picked up by someone else, Dyer said.

Stephen Hughes, 66, said he and his wife rushed home Tuesday after receiving a frantic call from a neighbor. Hughes came home to see a body draped in a blanket on the sidewalk leading to his front door.

He first thought the shooting was gang-related, but then he noticed the bag of groceries near the body. “It looks like a guy carrying his groceries home from the store,” Hughes said.

On what appeared to be Muhammad’s Facebook page, he repeatedly posted “#LetBlackPeopleGo” and encouraged “black warriors” to “mount up.” A flurry of posts emerged in the past day.

He wrote that his “kill rate increases tremendously on the other side” and also posted about “white devils.” On several occasions, he wrote updates that included the phrase “Allahu Akbar,” meaning “God is great” in Arabic.

Muhammad has a criminal history that includes arrests on weapons, drugs and false imprisonment charges and making terrorist threats. He had been associated with gangs, but he was not a confirmed member, police say.

A street is blocked off where emergency officials say a shooting has killed one person and injured two others Tuesday, April 18, 2017, in downtown Fresno, Calif.  (AP/Scott Smith)

Muhammad was charged in 2005 with possessing cocaine with intent to distribute, court records show. Federal prosecutors said at the time that he was also in possession of a 9mm semi-automatic handgun and two rifles after being convicted of a felony.

He claimed insanity, and his attorney requested a psychiatric examination for his client, saying Muhammad “appeared eccentric with some bizarre beliefs.” A psychiatrist who examined Muhammad believed he had psychosis, Muhammad’s attorney said in the court filing.

He also “suffered auditory hallucinations and had at least two prior mental health hospitalizations,” according to court documents. His attorney said that Muhammad had “paranoia” and thought the justice system and his defense attorney were conspiring against him, court papers said.

A street is blocked off where emergency officials say a shooting has killed one person and injured two others Tuesday, April 18, 2017, in downtown Fresno, Calif.  (AP/Scott Smith)

The attorney who represented Muhammad in that case did not return a call for comment Tuesday.

Public records list Muhammad as Cory Taylor and other aliases with addresses in Fresno and Sacramento. A woman who identified herself as Taylor’s grandmother said Tuesday that the family last saw him on Easter Sunday. She hung up the phone before giving her name.

Authorities spotted Muhammad running and took him into custody. Police are looking for the revolver.

Police say two of the victims may have been clients of Catholic Charities, which provides a variety of services for refugees, the homeless and those with disabilities.

“Anti-Racist” Protesters Segregate Themselves; Use White Students as a Buffer for the Police

http://www.renegadetribune.com/anti-racist-protestors-segregate-use-white-students-buffer-police/

 

Renegade Editor’s Note: The anti-racists anti-Whites have gone so far overboard these days that normal people, who wouldn’t even consider themselves pro-White, have come to realize the absurd double standards and blatant discrimination against White people. I have seen a dramatic increase in the number of journalists writing about these issues, corresponding with a growing readership hungry for honest reporting.

By Daniel Lang of The Daily Sheeple

The most ironic thing about the far-left these days, is that for all their talk about ending racism, they’re the ones who spend the most time dividing us by race. While most normal people are going about their lives, not paying any attention to the racial differences of their peers, it’s leftists who see racism around every corner and demand that we focus on our differences rather than what we have in common.

So it’s no surprise when this results in behaviour that sounds an awful lot like the racism these people are supposedly trying to stop. Take for instance, a student protest that occurred last Thursday at the Claremont McKenna College.

The students were organized by the “ShutDown Anti-BlackFascists,” Facebook group, in an effort to stifle a guest speaker by the name of Heather MacDonald (a conservative author who believes that there is a war on cops). The protesters managed to force Heather to cut her speech short and flee to an auditorium where her speech was then live-streamed. Hiram E. Chodosh, the president of the college, stated that “In the end, the effort to silence her voice effectively amplified it to a much larger audience.”

Leftist students shutting down free speech isn’t anything new at this point. What’s exceptional about this incident, is how the protest wound up being segregated. The organizers of the protest ordered the white students to the front, to act as a buffer between black students and the police. In a Facebook post made prior to the event, ShutDown Anti-Black Fascists instructed white students on what their role would be during the protest:

“For white accomplices: Please keep in mind that your role at this protest, aside from acting in solidarity with POC students at the 5Cs, particularly Black students, is to serve as a buffer between students of color and the police. That means, if the police come, it is imperative that you stay at the protest with fellow accomplices and engage with cops should it come to that…It is very important that there are white bodies at the action–please show up yourself for the entire duration of the event or if not have friends who can be trusted to go in your place.”

I wonder what this would look like if the racial roles were reversed? I think we have an answer, courtesy of South Park. (Language Warning)


This article originally appeared on The Daily Sheeple. Image credit.

 

Police: Repeatedly deported gang member raped 2-year-old girl

HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP) – A member of the MS-13 street gang who had been deported from the U.S. four times stabbed two women and sexually assaulted a 2-year-old girl in a New York City suburb, police said Thursday.

Tommy Vladim Alvarado-Ventura, 31, of Hempstead, pleaded not guilty and was ordered held without bail Thursday. His court-appointed attorney declined to comment.

Alvarado-Ventura is suspected of assaulting the child between Tuesday night and early Wednesday morning while the girl’s mother was at work, acting Nassau County Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter said at a news conference. He said investigators are still working to determine exactly when the child was assaulted.

Krumpter said that in his 28 years in law enforcement, the alleged crime is “probably the most heinous criminal act I’ve ever seen. It really is nauseating.”

Authorities said that Alvarado-Ventura had been in the home with the child late Tuesday night before going to a nearby bar, where he argued with a woman over a marijuana deal and then stabbed her in the parking lot. The woman, who was not identified, suffered a collapsed lung, police said.

He then returned to the apartment where the child lived, police said. When the child’s mother returned home from work at about 4:15 a.m. Wednesday, she discovered injuries to her child and argued with Alvarado-Ventura. During that argument, he stabbed the woman, Krumpter said.

The mother was able to flee to another part of the apartment and called police. Alvarado-Ventura was sleeping when officers arrived and arrested him, police said.

Police say Alvarado-Ventura was deported to El Salvador four times between 2006 and 2011. According to Krumpter, he had a history of prior arrests for offenses including drunken driving, disorderly conduct, assault, false impersonation and contempt of court. Details on those arrests were not immediately released; police said their investigation is ongoing.

It was not known when he returned to the United States. He was charged with attempted murder, assault and weapons possession, and he faces life in prison.

Online slip-up led police to JCC bomb threat suspect

The Israeli-American teenager arrested Thursday as the main suspect in a string of hoax bomb threats against Jewish institutions across the US and elsewhere appears to have made a key slip-up that led police to track him down, after months of evasion.

Israeli police described the suspect, an 18-year-old resident of the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon, as a hacker but said his motives were still unclear.

The Daily Beast reported Thursday that the youth used a number of sophisticated technologies, including Google Voice and spoofing technology to mask his IP when making the threats and remained untraceable for some time.

Over time, according to the report, he grew careless and failed on at least one occasion to route his internet connection through a proxy, leaving behind a real IP address traced back to Israel.

The location was traced to a nearby Wi-Fi access point the suspect was reaching via a large antenna pointing out his window.

Earlier, Yaniv Azani, head of technology in the Israel Police’s cyber unit, said the suspect used “several different means to camouflage the various layers of communication mechanisms” to carry out the calls.

Police banned publication of the suspect’s name, but said he would remain in custody until at least March 30. During the arrest raid, they said he tried to grab an officer’s gun but was stopped by another officer.

The arrest was announced by Israel Police on Thursday, after what they said was a months-long undercover joint investigation by the cyber unit of the Lahav 433 major crimes division and the FBI.

Police said they found at least five computers, a number of network interface controllers, satellite and antenna equipment during the arrest raid. According to Haaretz, the youth is refusing to sign a waiver allowing police to search his devices and is also refusing to cooperate, remaining silent during questioning.

Haaretz further reported that police suspect the teen may have received payment for some of his actions through a Bitcoin account. No further details were given.

The young man appeared briefly in court in the central Israeli city of Rishon Lezion. He wore khaki pants and a blue sweater that he used to cover his face as he walked past reporters. He made no comment.

He faces charges of extortion and is accused of sowing widespread fear and panic, police said.

A Jewish Israeli teen is brought for a court hearing at the Rishon Lezion Magistrate's Court, on suspicion of issuing fake bomb threats against Jewish institutions in the US and around the world, on March 23, 2017. At right is his lawyer, Galit Besh (Flash90)

His lawyer, Galit Besh, said her client had a “very serious medical condition” that might have affected his behavior. She said the condition had prevented him from attending elementary school, high school or enlisting in the army, which is compulsory for most Jewish men.

“That’s why the medical condition can actually affect the investigation,” she said. “This is one of the things the judge told the police to check, to talk to his doctors, to get more documents and to investigate him in light of his medical situation.”

Channel 10 said the condition was a nonmalignant brain tumor. It also showed images of a large antenna outside the suspect’s house in Ashkelon. Police said the suspect’s father was also detained, apparently because of the equipment. Late Thursday, police said the father’s detention had been extended by eight days.

In Washington, the FBI confirmed the arrest of the main suspect in the harassing phone calls.

Israel Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said the suspect allegedly placed dozens of threatening phone calls to public venues, synagogues and community buildings in the US, New Zealand and Australia. He also made a threat to Delta Airlines, causing a flight in February 2015 to make an emergency landing.

“He’s the guy who was behind the JCC threats,” Rosenfeld said, referring to the dozens of anonymous threats phoned in to Jewish community centers in the US over the past two months.

Nearly 150 bomb threats hit JCCs, Jewish day schools and other Jewish institutions since the beginning of the year, causing the evacuation of dozens of Jewish community centers. The threats have mostly come in waves, via phone and email. Many of the institutions have been threatened more than once.

While welcoming the arrest, many Jewish leaders in the US noted that the waves of bomb threats were accompanied by acts of vandalism in Jewish cemeteries and religious institutions within the US, actions that could not have been carried out from abroad.

Police believe suspect began JCC hoax bomb campaign because army rejected him

The Israeli-American teenager arrested Thursday on suspicion of phoning in over 100 hoax bomb threats against Jewish institutions across the US and elsewhere reportedly began making the calls after the army refused to accept him for military service, apparently on medical grounds.

Quoting Israeli police sources, Israel’s Channel 10 news said the army rejection infuriated and depressed him, and made him determined to show “what he was capable of.”

Parts of the case, including the 18-year-old suspect’s name, remain under a gag order in Israel.

The TV report said that the suspect was tracked down following an initial tip from New Zealand, one of several countries along with the United States to which he had telephoned hoax bomb threats to Jewish organizations.

FBI investigators are in Israel questioning the suspect along with Israeli police.

His father is also in detention, reportedly on suspicion that he knew what his son was doing, while his mother has disappeared.

The American-born Israeli teenager had been wreaking electronic havoc of one kind or another for three years, Israel’s Channel 10 reported without elaboration.

He called in threats to Jewish institutions in Europe, Australia and New Zealand, as well as the US, and also issued threats to airlines.

His dozens of calls to Jewish institutions, notably including US Jewish Community Centers in recent months, caused evacuations of schools and daycare centers and widespread concern.

He had been home-schooled, rarely left home, but did want to do his mandatory military service, and was refused, the TV report said, infuriating him and prompting his hoax calls campaign.

When he saw the impact his bomb threats were having, his motivation grew to make more calls, the TV report said. Here he was “in his little room” in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon, and “the whole world was paying attention… Little him, and the whole world was looking for him.”

The Daily Beast reported Thursday that the youth used a number of sophisticated technologies, including Google Voice and spoofing technology to mask his IP when making the threats.

Over time, according to the report, he grew careless and failed on at least one occasion to route his internet connection through a proxy, leaving behind a real IP address traced back to Israel.

The antenna in the window of the teen JCC bomb hoax suspect's Ashkelon room (Channel 10 screenshot)

The location was traced to a nearby Wi-Fi access point the suspect was reaching via a large antenna pointing out his window.

Yaniv Azani, head of technology in the Israel Police’s cyber unit, said the suspect used “several different means to camouflage the various layers of communication mechanisms” to carry out the calls.

Police banned publication of the suspect’s name, and said he would remain in custody until at least March 30. During the arrest raid, they said he tried to grab an officer’s gun but was stopped by another officer.

The arrest was announced by Israel Police on Thursday, after what they said was a months-long undercover joint investigation by the cyber unit of the Lahav 433 major crimes division and the FBI.

Police said they found at least five computers, a number of network interface controllers, satellite and antenna equipment during the arrest raid. According to Haaretz, the youth is refusing to sign a waiver allowing police to search his devices and is also refusing to cooperate, remaining silent during questioning.

The young man appeared briefly in court in the central Israeli city of Rishon Lezion. He wore khaki pants and a blue sweater that he used to cover his face as he walked past reporters. He made no comment.

He faces charges of extortion and is accused of sowing widespread fear and panic, police said.

A Jewish Israeli teen is brought for a court hearing at the Rishon Lezion Magistrate's Court, on suspicion of issuing fake bomb threats against Jewish institutions in the US and around the world, on March 23, 2017. At right is his lawyer, Galit Besh (Flash90)

His lawyer, Galit Besh, said her client had a “very serious medical condition” that might have affected his behavior. She said the condition had prevented him from attending elementary school, high school or enlisting in the army.

“That’s why the medical condition can actually affect the investigation,” she said. “This is one of the things the judge told the police to check, to talk to his doctors, to get more documents and to investigate him in light of his medical situation.”

Channel 10 said the condition was a nonmalignant brain tumor.

The father of American-Israeli Jewish teenager, accused of making dozens of anti-Semitic bomb threats in the United States and elsewhere, sits in court in Rishon Lezion on March 23, 2017. (AFP/JACK GUEZ)

In Washington, the FBI confirmed the arrest of the main suspect in the harassing phone calls.

US Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the arrest was the culmination of an investigation “spanning multiple continents.”

“Today’s arrest in Israel is the culmination of a large-scale investigation spanning multiple continents for hate crimes against Jewish communities across our country,” Sessions said in a statement Thursday.

Israel Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said the suspect allegedly placed dozens of threatening phone calls to public venues, synagogues and community buildings in the US, New Zealand and Australia. He also made a threat to Delta Airlines, causing a flight in February 2015 to make an emergency landing.

“He’s the guy who was behind the JCC threats,” Rosenfeld said, referring to the dozens of anonymous threats phoned in to Jewish community centers in the US over the past two months.

Nearly 150 bomb threats hit JCCs, Jewish day schools and other Jewish institutions since the beginning of the year, causing the evacuation of dozens of Jewish community centers. The threats have mostly come in waves, via phone and email. Many of the institutions have been threatened more than once.

While welcoming the arrest, many Jewish leaders in the US noted that the waves of bomb threats were accompanied by acts of vandalism in Jewish cemeteries and religious institutions within the US, actions that could not have been carried out from abroad.

Police believe single caller menacing JCCs, as more buildings threatened

NEW YORK — New York City’s head of police intelligence said Thursday that investigators believe one man using a voice changer and phone spoofing device is behind a large number of the scores of threats made against US Jewish institutions this year.

John Miller appeared on the show “CBS This Morning,” describing the attacks as coordinated. The spoofing device makes it appear the call is not coming from the number the man is using, and makes it appear it’s coming from within the institution, he said.

“We have an offender with some technical prowess here,” Miller said.

The Anti-Defamation League says 148 threats targeting Jewish institutions have been received across the country since January.

On Thursday, a Jewish children’s museum in Brooklyn was evacuated for a few hours after police investigated an emailed bomb threat. Hours later a JCC in Los Gatos, California, near San Jose, was evacuated over a bomb threat.

This undated photo provided by the Warren County Sheriff's Department in Warrenton, Mo., shows Juan Thompson, of St. Louis. (Warren County Sheriff's Department via AP)

This undated photo provided by the Warren County Sheriff’s Department in Warrenton, Mo., shows Juan Thompson, of St. Louis. (Warren County Sheriff’s Department via AP)

One arrest has been made in the threats, a St. Louis man accused of making eight of the calls in an effort to harass his ex-girlfriend. Juan Thompson has asked a federal judge in Missouri to release him on bond as he faces the federal charges out of New York. Thompson’s lawyer declined comment.

Miller said the New York Police Department is working with federal officials who are the lead investigators on the case. He said he’s working with institutions in New York to help them manage responses to the threats.

“Most of the time, the person who’s legitimately trying to do harm doesn’t call ahead to diminish the amount of harm he or she is doing,” he said.

Police arrest third suspect in Kim Jong Nam’s assassination

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — Three people have now been arrested in connection with the apparent fatal poisoning of the half-brother of North Korea’s leader, with a Malaysian man held to “assist” in the investigation, police said Thursday.

The man, 26-year-old Muhammad Farid bin Jalaluddin, has been identified as the boyfriend of an Indonesian woman arrested earlier Thursday, suspected of being one of the two women who carried out the brazen attack at Kuala Lumpur airport this week on Kim Jong Nam, the older half-brother of Kim Jong Un.

“Suspect is currently remanded in custody to assist investigation,” Khalid Abu Bakar, the inspector-general of police, said in a statement.

Kim Jong Nam, 45, was attacked by two women at Kuala Lumpur International Airport on Monday as he went to check in for a flight to Macau, his main base since he went into exile about 15 years ago. They grabbed him and sprayed some kind of poison on his face.

He sought medical help at the airport but died in an ambulance on the way to the hospital.

Two women were captured on surveillance video leaving the scene by taxi, sparking a nationwide hunt for them.

One woman, who was traveling on a Vietnamese passport that identified her as 29-year-old Doan Thi Huong, was arrested Wednesday as she tried to fly out of Kuala Lumpur.

She told police she was tricked into attacking Kim Jong Nam, saying she thought she was just playing a prank on the man, the Star newspaper reported.

She also said she was abandoned by the other woman and four men who were involved in the attack. They had all been staying at a hotel not far from the airport, she told police, and when they left her, she decided to fly to Vietnam from the terminal where the attack took place.

A second woman, identified as Siti Aishah, a 25-year-old Indonesian, was arrested early Thursday.

“She was also positively identified from the CCTV footage at the airport and was alone at the time of arrest,” Abu Bakar said in an earlier statement.

It was not immediately clear whether the women were using fake passports, but the Indonesia Foreign Ministry confirmed, based on information provided by the Malaysian police, that the Aishah was an Indonesian citizen and has requested consular access to her.

Separately, Ahmad Zahid Hamidi, Malaysia’s deputy prime minister, confirmed that the man who was killed was indeed Kim Jong Nam, the son of former leader Kim Jong Il and older half-brother of Kim Jong Un.

The man was carrying North Korean passport bearing the name “Kim Chol,” a known alias for Kim Jong Nam.

“The North Korean embassy has confirmed the identity. This is what the police informed us,” Zahid told reporters. Kim Jong Nam appeared to have had two passports with two different names – one “authentic” and one an “undercover document,” he said.

However, although the autopsy has now been completed – despite protests from North Korean diplomats based in Kuala Lumpur, who wanted to body released to them immediately – there is still no word on the cause of death.

A North Korean man driving a black Mercedes with North Korean diplomatic plates refused to answer a journalist’s questions when he drove into the embassy in Kuala Lumpur Thursday afternoon.

Embassy staff have removed the buzzer from the gate to stop journalists from ringing it.

Malaysia would return Kim Jong Nam’s body to North Korea, Zahid said Thursday, but there were still “procedures to be followed.”

“Our policy is that we have to honor our bilateral relations with any foreign country,” he told reporters.

REPORT: POLICE LIKELY TO RECOMMEND NETANYAHU INDICTMENT

As ongoing investigations in multiple cases against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu continue, police are reportedly preparing to wrap up Case 1000, allegedly involving illegal gifts, in four-to-six weeks. Channel 2 reported on Friday evening that police are likely to conclude this investigation with a recommendation to indict Netanyahu.

Police had already made the decision to separate the case from other ongoing investigations. The case is set to be transferred to prosecution once the investigation comes to a close.

 

Netanyahu is expected to undergo at least one more questioning in the investigation.

The prime minister has already been questioned under caution three times in Case 1000, as well as in a separate case dealing with an alleged attempt to broker favorable media coverage with Yediot Aharonot publisher Arnon Mozes.

Last week, it was reported that Australian billionaire James Packer was also summoned by the police to testify over gifts he allegedly gave to the Netanyahu family. Police reportedly suspected Packer of giving the prime minister’s son Yair lavish gifts, including free hotel rooms and flights, in order to influence his father. Yair was questioned by the police on the matter on January 17.

Eliyahu Kamisher contributed to this report.

Police kill man whose stabbing rampage injured 3 on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood

Los Angeles police fatally shot a man in a Hollywood fast-food restaurant Tuesday, just moments after the man stabbed three others in an apparently unprovoked attack.

The assailant — described only as a man in his 30s — stabbed a bicyclist about 2 p.m. along the north side of Sunset Boulevard near Ivar Avenue, said Sgt. Frank Preciado, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Police Department.

The attack occurred on a popular corridor along Sunset Boulevard, near the ArcLight Cinemas, Amoeba Music and the Los Angeles offices of CNN.

The assailant then ran down Sunset Boulevard and tried to get into a coffee shop, where employees held the door shut against him, Preciado said.

Next, the man continued eastbound and walked into a Jack in the Box, where he stabbed another man, Preciado said.

As the second victim fled the fast-food restaurant, police officers rushed inside. The man then knifed a third person.

Officers confronted the man and shot him an unknown number of times. Preciado said police also attempted to use a Taser.

The man died at the scene. Authorities did not release his name, and investigators were still trying to determine a motive for the attacks, Preciado said.

Video posted on social media from inside the restaurant showed a person calling for a belt or shoelace to be used as a tourniquet for a victim sitting in a chair with a pool of blood on the floor.

Moans could be heard. As an officer reports “shots fired,” another officer can be seen kneeling over a person face-down on the ground and holding the person’s arm.

L.A. City Councilman Mitch O’Farrell, whose district includes Hollywood and East Hollywood, commended LAPD officers for their swift response.

“It saved lives,” O’Farrell said at a news conference Tuesday night.

Investigators were unsure if the assailant knew the three victims, or if they were otherwise connected in some way, police said.

For the inquiry into the shooting, authorities were planning to review surveillance video. Preciado said there was no footage from body-worn cameras to review.

All three victims were taken to hospitals with stab wounds. Two were initially listed in critical condition and were undergoing surgery late Tuesday, according to Josh Rubenstein, a spokesman for the LAPD. Both were considered medically stable.

The third man was expected to be released from the hospital Wednesday.