WISCONSIN STUDENTS BLAME ISRAEL FOR VIOLENCE AGAINST AFRICAN-AMERICANS

 

The student government of the University of Wisconsin-Madison unanimously passed on Wednesday a divestment resolution targeting companies operating in many countries that included an amendment specifically about Israel.

An amendment added to the one-page resolution, which Jewish students said brought the resolution more in line with the proposal that failed a month ago, blames Israel for police violence against African-Americans, citing an exchange program in which senior American police officers travel to Israel to learn about counterterrorism, the pro-Israel organization StandWithUS said in a statement.

 

During debate on the resolution, anti-Israel activists called the Jewish community “oppressors” and said that Jewish students oppose divestment against Israel because it threatens their “white privilege.”

A Jewish member of the Associated Students of Madison was publicly targeted and harassed by other members of the student government during the meeting as well, according to the campus Hillel.

“The behavior of members of ASM to publicly target and harass the Jewish students and in particular the one Jewish student on ASM was reprehensible,” the university Hillel’s executive director, Greg Steinberger, said in a statement issued following the meeting. “We look forward to engaging the university and the state in a review of what happened tonight at the ASM meeting.”

In a statement issued after the vote, the university administration said the resolution is nonbinding and will not result in a change in university policies or its approach to investing.

The resolution passed Wednesday by the Associated Students of Madison by a 24-0 vote, with two abstentions, calls on the university and its foundation to divest from companies involved in private prisons, arms manufacture, fossil fuels and border walls, and banks that “oppress marginalized communities.”

The vote comes a month after a divestment resolution specifically targeting Israel failed to pass the student government and two weeks after the student government passed a proposal to create a new financial transparency and ethics subcommittee. The meeting was held April 12, the second day of Passover, when several Jewish representatives were absent.

Wednesday’s resolution uses language brokered between Jewish student leaders and the authors to target unethical corporations in more general terms without attacking Israel. However, during the open forum discussion prior to the vote, some students called for the one-page resolution to be amended to include specific countries and issues, the Daily Cardinal student newspaper reported.

“We are concerned that the actions taken tonight appear to violate a ruling of the Student Judiciary; Jewish members of student government, who raised this issue with the Student Judiciary, walked out of the meeting after expressing concerns that the process was undemocratic and not transparent,” the statement said.

“UW-Madison values and welcomes members of all faiths and identities. We have heard clearly from the Jewish community how targeted they feel by the actions of the last month. Chancellor [Rebecca] Blank has made clear her opposition to the concept of BDS and academic boycotts.”

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PA tells Israel it will no longer pay for Gaza’s electricity

The Palestinian Authority on Thursday informed Israel it would no longer pay for electricity that the Jewish state supplies to the Gaza Strip, as a power crisis in the Hamas-run enclave deepened.

News of the PA refusal to sponsor electricity came in a statement by the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories (COGAT).

Hamas spokesperson Sami Abu Zuhri called the move “a dangerous escalation, and a fit of insanity.”

“We warn Israel against taking this move,” he said.

The move is one of a series of measures taken recently by the PA, aimed at forcing Hamas to either take full responsibility for the territory it governs, or to relinquish control back to the PA.

The PA’s power play comes during an existing energy crisis, after Hamas refused to buy fuel from the PA for the enclave’s only power plant.

Currently, the energy shortage in Gaza has left the Strip’s residents with as little as four hours of power a day.

The World Bank said on Thursday the power cuts have led to a “humanitarian crisis,” hitting hospitals, clinics, water supply and other vital services, as well as household needs.

A newborn is seen inside an incubator at the neonatal intensive care unit at the Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza City on April 23, 2017. (Said Khatib/AFP)

Without energy provided by Israel, it is unclear how Gaza can maintain even its current scarce levels of electricity.

Israel has been providing Gaza energy through 10 power lines, supplying 125 megawatts, which is 30 percent of the amount needed to power Gaza 24 hours a day.

The cost of this energy supply, which was paid for by the PA, was NIS 40 million a month.

The only other source of energy is provided by Egyptian power lines, which provide 25 megawatts — just 6.25% of the amount necessary to power Gaza for a full day.

Private individuals or international donors can pick up the energy bill for Gaza.

In the past, Qatar has stepped in to buy fuel for the power plant, but has so far showed no intention of coming to the Strip’s rescue in the current crisis.

The Hamas terror group seized power in Gaza in 2007 from the Ramallah-based Fatah organization of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas.

Since then, however, the PA has continued to use a large amount of its small budget to pay for vital infrastructure in the enclave.

In 2016, the PA’s overall budget was $4.14 billion, of which the Gaza Strip’s share was $1.65 billion–approximately 40 percent of PA funds.

At the same time, Hamas has continued to impose high taxes on Gaza’s residents, while funneling the revenue into its coffers and military wing for weaponry to fight Israel.

Members of the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades, the military wing of the Palestinian Islamist movement Hamas, attend a memorial in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah on January 31, 2017. (Abed Rahim Khatib/Flash90)

The renewed push by the PA to regain a foothold in Gaza comes ahead of Abbas’s meeting with US President Donald Trump at the White House next week. Ahead of the Washington confab, Abbas was under pressure to show that he represents all Palestinians, including those in Gaza.

In March, Hamas announced it would form an administrative committee to further its governance in Gaza. The announcement infuriated Abbas, who immediately began taking steps to squeeze Hamas out of power.

In early April, Abbas reduced by one-third the salaries of tens of thousands of employees of the pre-Hamas government in Gaza who had been paid for the last decade, on condition that they stay home.

The ongoing salary payments had been intended to ensure loyalty to Abbas, but inadvertently also propped up Hamas by injecting cash into Gaza’s fragile economy.

Khalil al-Haya, the second-highest ranking Hamas leader in Gaza, told The Associated Press on Wednesday that Abbas will fail “if he tries to make Gaza kneel or expects to win our loyalty by force.”

“You can’t punish the one who lives in tough conditions,” al-Haya said. “Gaza is an explosive barrel and he (Abbas) cannot press this barrel more. If he does, it’s going to explode in his face and in all directions.”

Israel’s intelligence minister urges US to team up with Russia against Iran

WASHINGTON — The Israeli government wants the United States to negotiate with the Russians to ensure Iran does not gain a permanent military foothold in Syria, Israel’s Intelligence and Transportation Minister Yisrael Katz said.

In meetings with senior-level administration officials and high-ranking members of Congress, Katz urged the US to get the Russians to remove Iranian forces from the country, which is in the sixth year of a devastating civil war.

“We discussed how the Americans can negotiate with the Russians,” he said in an interview Wednesday. “It’s in the common interest not only for Israel, but for the Sunni Arab countries in the region.”

Katz, who is a member of the high-level security cabinet, was sent to Washington by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to discuss Syria and other matters with American officials.

“In our region, there are two different things, but the things that are existing now are, on the one hand, big threats and dangers, and on the other hand, big chances for cooperation,” he said.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, right, seen next to Transportation Minister Yisrael Katz at the weekly cabinet meeting at Netanyahu's office in Jerusalem, September 4, 2016. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)

Israel believes that Trump is signaling a new policy toward the Middle East — evident in his ordering a missile attack on a Syrian airfield over an Assad regime chemical weapons attack, and his rhetoric toward Tehran — that will possibly include shifts in how Washington deals with the Iranian challenge, Katz said.

“There is a new policy in the United States, and Iran is on the bad side, not the good side,” he said. “It’s very clear. You see it in declarations and acts.

“Because of the next American policy against Iran, against the Shi’ite axis that Iran leads with the backing of Russia, this is a big opportunity to bring real changes to the regional security situation,” he added.

Katz came to Washington after visiting New York, where he addressed the World Jewish Congress.

‘There is a new policy in the United States, and Iran is on the bad side and not the good side’

In the capital, he met with North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr (R), chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, and New York Rep. Adam Schiff (D), ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee.

He discussed with them Israel’s hope that the US will negotiate with the Russians to remove an Iranian military foothold in Syria.

Katz insisted that Trump could apply pressure to Russian President Vladimir Putin to soften his resolve to prop up Assad.

“If the Russians want to keep Assad, they have to push Iran out of Syria,” Katz said. The White House is “very close to deciding that Assad has to go,” he added, “so if the Russians want to have the chance to keep Assad in his job, they have to act and to help move Iran out of Syria. Because if they will not do it, they will move Iran out or we will move Assad out.”

On Wednesday, Katz also met with Trump’s Special Envoy for International Negotiations Jason Greenblatt to discuss his plan to develop a regional transportation system that would link Israel to Saudi Arabia by railroad via the West Bank and Jordan.

Assistant to the President and Special Representative for International Negotiations, Jason Greenblatt, left, meets Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the Prime Minister’s Office in Jerusalem, March 13, 2017. (Kobi Gideon/GPO)

“We are maybe going to call it not a truck rail, but a Trump rail,” he said.

Katz said he believes the administration will support his initiative, not necessarily as a component of its hope to broker a “conflict-ending” Israeli-Palestinian accord, but to improve the region, which could foster greater conditions for a peace deal.

“If the United States would support it — and we want them to support it — it would be very much in their interests, because it would be good for Jordan’s economy, its stability, and for the Palestinians’ [economy] as well,” he said.

He also said there was “a strategic logic” to solidify ties between the Sunni world and Israel, which share an interest in countering the Iranian-led Shiite axis.

After the meeting in which Katz presented his plan to Greenblatt, the former lawyer tweeted: “I look forward to discussing the possibilities with all parties.”

Congressman: In Israel, Trump will announce embassy move

WASHINGTON — Florida Rep. Ron DeSantis (R) said Thursday that US President Donald Trump will announce the relocation of the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem when he visits Israel at the end of May, fulfilling a campaign promise he appeared to walk back after assuming office.

Trump’s planned visit — his first to the Jewish state — coincides with Jerusalem Day, when Israel will celebrate 50 years since the reunification of the city under Israeli control after the 1967 Six Day War.

“What better time could there be to announce the relocation of the US embassy to Jerusalem than when you are over here celebrating with our Israeli friends this very important 50th anniversary of the liberation of Jerusalem?” DeSantis said.

Israeli officials confirmed on Thursday that Trump’s team is planning a visit on May 22. The White House told The Times of Israel that it is “exploring” the visit, but did not flesh out any further details.

US President Donald Trump smiles during a national teacher of the year event in the Oval Office of the White House April 26, 2017 in Washington, DC. (AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski)

“I think the announcement of that trip is a signal that it is more likely to happen than not, and will send a powerful signal to other countries around the world that America is back and will stand by our allies and will not let folks cower us into not doing the right thing,” added DeSantis.

The Florida congressman’s remarks were made at an event on Capitol Hill launching the Congressional Israel Victory Caucus, a group made up of several staunchly pro-Israel Republicans.

DeSantis, who is chairman of the House Oversight National Security Subcommittee, has oversight on American embassies around the world. A Trump ally, he has been adamant the president will follow through on this campaign pledge.

Last month, the congressman visited Jerusalem touring potential embassy sites and told reporters Trump would eventually authorize the relocation, or, at the least, allow it to happen. Indeed, on that trip, he also predicted the president would announce the move around the anniversary of the Six Day War.

Donald Trump speaking at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) 2016 Policy Conference at the Verizon Center in Washington, DC, March 21, 2016. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images via JTA)

“He’s in a position where he’s either going to follow his campaign promise or he’s actually going to have to sign this waiver, and I just think knowing the president, he has been a man of his word,” he said.

“I don’t think that he’s going to, on the same month where people here in Jerusalem are celebrating the 50th anniversary of Jerusalem Day, sign the waiver. I would bet that he would not do that and he would announce that the embassy would be moving.”

Indeed, Trump’s trip to Israel also coincides with an important decision he will have to make on whether to move on the status of the US Embassy in Israel.

Congress passed a law, in 1995, mandating the embassy be moved to Jerusalem, but allowed the president to exercise a six-month waiver on national security grounds. Every president since, including Barack Obama’s predecessors George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, signed such a waiver every six months.

The last waiver, signed in December by Obama, expires at the end of May, when Trump will have to decide whether to sign it or follow through on his campaign promise and allow the change.

Republican Reps. Ron DeSantis of Florida, Keith Rothfus of Pennsylvania, Doug Lamborn of Colorado and Alex Mooney of West Virginia, speak at the launch of the Congressional Israel Victory Caucus on Capitol Hill on April 27, 2017 (Courtesy, Middle East Forum)

The move would be a highly symbolic gesture, valued by Israel as confirmation of the city as its capital, but strongly opposed by Palestinians and the Arab world.

After vowing to move the embassy practically immediately, Trump changed course at the onset of his presidency.

Following meetings with Arab leaders, and especially Jordan’s King Abdullah II at the National Prayer Breakfast, Trump said he would like to see the move take place eventually but that he wouldn’t go through with it right away.

Trump’s pick to serve as US ambassador to Israel, David Friedman, was also highly vocal in his resolution that the president would move the embassy, saying in an announcement of his nomination that he expected to carry out his duties in Jerusalem.

Friedman is due to arrive in Jerusalem on May 15 and to present his credentials to President Reuven Rivlin in June.

Israel said pushing for massive East Jerusalem expansion as Trump visits

The Housing Ministry is reportedly pushing forward with a massive plan that would add some 25,000 new homes to Jerusalem, including 15,000 units over the Green Line, in a move that may test the new US administration’s understandings with Israel over building in areas the Palestinians want for a state.

According to a Channel 2 report Thursday, the plan is set to be announced while US President Donald Trump is in the country in late May, coinciding with the 50th anniversary of Israel’s capture of East Jerusalem and the unification of the once-divided city.

Housing Minister Yoav Galant (Kulanu) is pushing the initiative in meetings with Jerusalem city officials.

According to the report, the plan will cost some NIS 4 billion ($1.1 billion).

Parts of the plan were reported by Channel 10 earlier in the week.

Galant’s office and the Jerusalem municipality could not be immediately contacted for confirmation.

Israeli officials confirmed on Thursday that Trump’s team is planning a visit on May 22. The White House told The Times of Israel that it is “exploring” the visit, but did not flesh out any further details. Jerusalem Day, which marks the capture of East Jerusalem during the 1967 war, begins that evening.

Of the 15,000 units planned over the Green Line, the lion’s share would be in two new residential neighborhoods: Atarot in the north of the city and Givat Hamatos in the south.

The Atarot industrial zone, with Ramallah suburb Kafr Aqab seen in background. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)

Atarot, currently an industrial area near Ramallah that is home to a small abandoned airport, would see 10,000 homes built, marketed for ultra-Orthodox families.

In a statement, the municipality said it had not yet decided how to use the area of the old Atarot airport and was reviewing several options.

Another 2,000 would be built in Givat Hamatos, a mostly empty hill that critics say could cut East Jerusalem off from neighboring Bethlehem.

A mobile home in Givat Hamatos, seen in 2014. (Flash90)

A further 3,000 would be built in Ramat Shlomo, an existing ultra-Orthodox neighborhood in the city’s north.

In 2010, a building plan for Ramat Shlomo was announced during a visit by US vice president Joe Biden, sparking a diplomatic crisis between Jerusalem and Washington.

In addition the plan includes 1,000 homes near Malha, 2,000 in Arnona and Ramat Rahel, and 7,000 in Ein Kerem and other parts of the western half of Jerusalem.

The proposal is slated to be one of the largest housing projects over the pre-1967 Green Line in recent years, a period when Israel faced significant international pressure to halt construction in the West Bank and East Jerusalem.

Both the Atarot and Givat Hamatos plans were frozen during the tenure of former US president Barak Obama, a harsh critic of Israel’s building policy in East Jerusalem and the West Bank.

Trump, seen as more conciliatory on the subject than his predecessor, has nevertheless said that he does not consider settlements “a good thing for peace” and has asked the Israelis to “hold back” on settlement building.

Housing Minister Yoav Galant arrives for the weekly cabinet meeting at the Prime Minister's Office in Jerusalem, December 18, 2016. (Marc Israel Sellem)

Israel, which annexed East Jerusalem after the 1967 war and considers it part of its undivided capital, does not regard building in the city as settlement activity and has said in maintains the right to build anywhere within municipal boundaries.

During recent discussions between Israeli and US officials over where Washington would tolerate building, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he would not “negotiate” on halting construction of new homes in Jewish neighborhoods in East Jerusalem.

Fmr CIA Officer Philip Giraldi: Israel is NOT an Ally of the United States

http://www.renegadetribune.com/fmr-cia-officer-philip-giraldi-israel-not-ally-united-states/

 

This speech was from a few years ago, but remains just as relevant today. Israel spies on us, buys off our politicians, and wages war on our country.

US envoy Haley: ‘It’s a new day for Israel at the UN’

“It’s a new day for Israel at the UN,” US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told delegates at the World Jewish Congress Plenary Assembly in New York on Tuesday.

In front of a crowd of some 600 Jewish activists and leaders from 90 different countries, Haley emphasized that the US will not remain silent when Israel is attacked at the UN.

“Silence is not my thing anyway,” she said, “but that’s especially true when it comes to standing up for America’s friends. And we have no better friend in the Middle East than Israel.”

Last month, Israel announced it would reduce its annual membership payment to the United Nations by $2 million following recent “anti-Israel” votes in the organization’s bodies.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Emmanuel Nahshon said the decision was taken following votes critical of Israel at the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council, and condemned the “obsessive discrimination against Israel on the part of the United Nations and its agencies.”

Israel is the only country in the world that is the subject of a permanent agenda item at the HRC, a fact that former US ambassador to the UN Samantha Power also took issue with in a speech similar to Haley’s in December 2015. Power blasted the “absurdity” that Israel, “not Syria, which gasses its citizens,” was singled out at the UNHRC.

Members of the UN Security Council vote in favor of condemning Israel's settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem on Friday, Dec. 23, 2016 at United Nations Headquarters. (Manuel Elias/United Nations via AP)

In her Tuesday speech, Haley urged UN member states to accept the US view that Iran’s influence in the region deserves the attention wrongly directed at Israel.

“The truth is that Iran is the world’s number one state sponsor of terrorism. The truth is that Iran is the number one source of instability in the Middle East,” she said.

On Monday, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told WJC delegates that he too would stand up against anti-Israel bias at the international organization, vowing to stand “on the front lines in the fight against anti-Semitism.”

Trump expected in Israel last week of May; Nikki Haley to visit in June

A Trump administration delegation is expected to arrive in Israel on Thursday to oversee technical arrangements for a visit by President Donald Trump to Israel in the last week of May.

Israel’s Deputy Foreign Minister Tzipi Hotovely confirmed on Wednesday afternoon that preparations for Trump’s visit were at the advanced stage, although it has not yet been finalized, and told Army Radio, “There’s a feeling that we have a real friend in the White House.”

The visit will be Trump’s first ever trip to Israel. Channel 2 said he is expected to stay for one night only, and that it is not yet clear whether he will visit the Palestinian areas. The president hosted Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in February and is set to host Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on May 3.

The advance delegation will hold talks at the Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem, and visit possible sites for the president’s itinerary.

On the eve of May 23 and on May 24, Israel will mark Jerusalem Day, celebrating 50 years since the reunification of the city under Israeli control in the 1967 Six Day War. Israel extended sovereignty to East Jerusalem and the Old City and claims the entire city as its capital; the Palestinians seek East Jerusalem as the capital of an independent Palestinian state. The Channel 2 report, noting the resonance of the date for Israelis and Palestinians, said Trump’s visit would not be on Jerusalem Day itself.

The TV report also said that Nikki Haley, the US Ambassador to the United Nations, will visit Israel in June. Haley has become a particularly popular member of the Trump administration in Israel and in the pro-Israel community in the US for her repeated castigations of anti-Israel bias at the UN.

US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley acknowledges the applause as she arrives to speak at the AIPAC policy conference in Washington, DC, March 27, 2017 (AIPAC screenshot)

Israel Radio said the talks on Trump’s visit had been going on for several weeks. A senior diplomatic official told the radio that the chances of Trump coming to Israel were at 80 percent.

No US president has visited Israel in the first months of his term. Richard Nixon was the first serving president to visit, in 1974. Jimmy Carter came in 1979, after brokering the Camp David accords between Israel and Egypt. Bill Clinton visited a record four times, and George W. Bush came twice.

The last serving US president to visit Israel was Barack Obama, who came to Jerusalem for just a few hours to attend the funeral of former president and prime minister Shimon Peres last September. He previously made an official visit to Israel in March 2013. Obama did not visit Israel, however, on his first trip to the Middle East in 2009, which included a landmark outreach speech to the Muslim world delivered in Cairo.

Trump, whose first scheduled foreign trip as president is a visit to Brussels on May 25, is looking to expand on that trip by arriving in Israel on May 21 or in the days after, other Hebrew media reports said.

His trip to Israel will also coincide with an important decision Trump will have to make on whether to move the US Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem as he promised in his election campaign.

During his election campaign Trump vowed that if victorious he would relocate the US Embassy to Jerusalem, a highly symbolic move valued by Israel as confirmation of the city as its capital, but strongly opposed by Palestinians and the Arab world which want East Jerusalem as the capital of a future Palestinian state.

However, following meetings with Arab leaders, Trump has appeared to back away from the move, saying only that he was still considering it.

A Jewish man covers himself with a prayer shawl while praying near the Western Wall in Jerusalem's Old City during the Passover priestly blessing on April 13, 2017. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

At the end of last year, Obama signed a waiver to prevent moving the embassy to Jerusalem. It was the eighth time that Obama signed the waiver, which must be renewed every six months. This latest waiver expires at the end of May.

Congress passed a law in 1995 mandating the move of the embassy to Jerusalem, but allowed the president to exercise a waiver, citing the national security interests of the United States. Obama’s predecessors George W. Bush and Bill Clinton also signed such waivers.

David Friedman, Trump’s designated US ambassador to Israel, is also a strong supporter of the move, saying in December following the announcement of his nomination that he was eager to begin working from “the US Embassy in Israel’s eternal capital, Jerusalem.”

US President Donald Trump, right, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hold a joint press conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington DC, February 15, 2017. (AFP/Saul Loeb)

Numerous members of Israel’s governing coalition have hailed the planned embassy move, with Netanyahu saying in December that it would be “great.”

However, the Palestinians have come out sharply against it. Abbas said that moving the embassy would “destroy the prospects of any political process,” and a spokesman for his Fatah party said it would “open the gates of hell in the region and in the whole world.”

In March, Representative Ron DeSantis, a Republican from Florida who led a small fact-finding mission to investigate the logistics of moving the embassy, speculated that Trump could make the announcement of the move on Jerusalem Day.

“Knowing the president — he’s been a man of his word — I don’t think that he’s going to, in the same month that people here in Jerusalem are celebrating the 50th anniversary of Jerusalem Day, sign the waiver. I would bet that he would not do that and that he would announce that the embassy is going to be moving,” DeSantis said during his visit.

Trump has never visited Israel before.

Last May, during his election campaign, Trump said he planned to visit Israel before the November 18 elections, but the visit never happened.

The then-presumptive GOP nominee backed out of a visit to Israel in December 2016.

At the time of the cancellation, Trump was under heavy criticism for rolling out his proposal to temporarily ban Muslims from entering the US, following deadly terror attacks in Paris and California.

White House confirms it’s ‘exploring’ a Trump visit to Israel

WASHINGTON — The White House is currently considering plans for US President Donald Trump to visit Israel, an administration official told The Times of Israel on Wednesday, confirming speculation that talks for a trip are underway.

“We are exploring the possibility of a future visit to Israel as well as other countries,” the official said.

It would be Trump’s first visit to Israel.

Earlier on Wednesday, Channel 2 reported that Trump is expected to arrive in Israel for one night at the end of May and Israel’s Deputy Foreign Minister Tzipi Hotovely told Army Radio that preparations for the visit were at an advanced stage, although specifics have not yet been finalized.

It is not clear whether the president would also visit the Palestinian Authority. He is scheduled to host PA President Mahmoud Abbas at the White House on May 3.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu visited Trump in Washington in February.

PM Netanyahu and US President Donald Trump at the White House, February 15, 2017 (Avi Ohayun/GPO)

The Channel 2 report said an advance US delegation will hold talks at the Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem and visit possible sites for the president’s itinerary.

The trip may take place on May 23 and 24, when Israel will mark Jerusalem Day, celebrating 50 years since the reunification of the city under Israeli control in the 1967 Six Day War.

Israel extended sovereignty to East Jerusalem and the Old City and claims the entire city as its capital; the Palestinians seek East Jerusalem as the capital of an independent Palestinian state.

No US president has visited Israel in the first months of his term.

Richard Nixon was the first serving president to visit — in 1974, nearly five years after he first took office. Jimmy Carter came in 1979, more than two years into his term, after brokering the Camp David peace accords between Israel and Egypt. Bill Clinton visited a record four times, and George W. Bush came twice.

US President Barack Obama seen at the state funeral ceremony for former Israeli President Shimon Peres at Mount Herzl, in Jerusalem, on September 30, 2016. (Emil Salman/POOL)

The last serving US president to visit Israel was Barack Obama, who came to Jerusalem for just a few hours to attend the funeral of former president and prime minister Shimon Peres last September. He previously made an official visit to Israel in March 2013, at the start of his second term in office.

Obama did not visit Israel, however, on his first trip to the Middle East in 2009, which included a major speech to the Muslim world delivered in Cairo.

Trump, whose first scheduled foreign trip as president is a visit to Brussels on May 25, is looking to expand on that trip by arriving in Israel on May 21 or in the days after, some Hebrew media reports said this week.

His trip to Israel could also coincide with an important decision Trump will have to make on whether to move the US Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, as he promised during his election campaign.

The move would be a highly symbolic gesture valued by Israel as confirmation of the city as its capital, but strongly opposed by Palestinians and the Arab world.

Following meetings with Arab leaders, however, especially Jordan’s King Abdullah II, Trump has appeared to back away from the move, saying only that he was still considering it.

Congress passed a law in 1995 mandating the move of the embassy to Jerusalem, but allowed the president to exercise a six-month waiver on national security grounds. Every president since, including Obama’s predecessors George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, have signed such a waiver every six months.

The last waiver, signed in December by Obama, expires at the end of May, when Trump will have to make a decision whether to sign it or follow through on his campaign promise to allow the embassy relocation

The White Freemason Donald Trump is a Shill for Israel

http://www.renegadetribune.com/freemason-trump-shill-israel/

 

The Oxford Dictionary defines a shill as someone working as an accomplice of a confidence trickster or swindler who poses as a genuine customer to entice or encourage others. The word was first used in an English sentence in 1916 and was thought to be a corruption of the word shillabers. This writer couldn’t get any modern dictionary to admit it, but it is believed that it is of Yiddish origin.

In a March 29th Politico article titled The Crisis of Trumpism, political writer Rich Lowry writes about a perceived identity crisis Trump is suffering:

This isn’t a function of poll numbers, or the Russia controversy, or any other melodrama of the past three months, but something more fundamental: No officeholder in Washington seems to understand President Donald Trump’s populism or have a cogent theory of how to effect it in practice, including the president himself.

The President seems to be in a quandary at this early juncture in his administration. The scene is almost Shakespearian in nature as in Hamlet’s dilemma where he spurts forth the question “To be, or not to be.”

Trump appears to be a reluctant revolutionary, who after fighting a long and bitter election campaign, has suddenly realized the danger and the enormity of his role and has slowed his pace and has become loathe to continue with the implementation of many of his campaign promises.

midnightfreemasons.orgMost Mason-watchers are certain that Trump is a private Mason. He doesn’t admit that he is a brother in this secret society but most certainly he is. This behavior is not at all uncommon. Let’s face it, the organization is secretive.

What might Trump’s membership in the “Craft” augur for his administration? Freemasons, especially those higher up in the organization, are accused, by those bold enough to say it, of being pro-Jewish or philo-Semitic in their social and political alignment.

Is there a nexus between the Freemasons and the Jews? Are the zeitgeists of these two entities historically and culturally intertwined and have they, through time, become partners in one great scheme to control the world? Over the last century or so, has a Judeo-Masonic establishment emerged in America?

Israeli interests wrest control of the west wing

The Trump White House is very much a family affair. Jared Kushner, over the past weeks, has succeeded in “squeezing-out” Steve Bannon and his right-wing Breitbart gang (the Kushner family, by the way, have always been known as prominent Democrats). His wife, first-daughter Ivanka, has been given an office in the west wing as well. This New York “power couple” are orthodox Jews, who rigidly observe their sabbath (Saturday), and refrain from any kind of work on this day, much to the president’s chagrin.

Jared and Ivanka are close personal friends to Israeli PM Bibi Netanyahu and his wife. The Kushner family, particularly Jared’s dad, Charles Kushner, are major donors to pro-Israel and Jewish causes. One time, in Jared’s youth, he gave up his bed and moved to the basement so Netanyahu could spend the night at their home in Livingston, New Jersey.

 

The Kushner influence was displayed to the world these past few weeks when it became apparent to Trump-watchers, that the erstwhile consigliere Steve Bannon no longer had the president’s ear. This was the man who steered Trump through the general election last fall, and got him elected. This seemed to confirm that it was Kushner’s influence that also determined the fate of top campaign advisers Roger Stone, Corey Lewandowsky and Paul Manafort and, for that matter, national security adviser Michael Flynn—let alone the selection of Mike Pence as Trump’s running mate over Chris Christie (who as a U.S. Attorney years earlier, had sent Kushner’s father to jail). The Trump White House is being managed like a family business, and that’s not a good thing!

Trump has, since the November election, brought many left-leaning Democratic and foreign policy hawks into his administration. Many of these people are connected to the globalist-oriented banking firm of Goldman Sachs and in foreign policy, they are very much pro-Israel.

Gary D. Cohn

One of the bright lights emerging in the Trump White House is one the president himself refers to as “one of my geniuses”. His name is Gary D. Cohn, who is a Democrat and former Goldman Sachs president. According to aides close to him, he is muscling aside some of his boss’s most hard-right advisers to push for more business-friendly economic policies and a more hawkish, anti-Putin posture in the middle-east much to the delight of the Israel-firsters.

Cohn, 56, did not work on Republican Trump’s campaign and only got to know him after the November election, but he has emerged as one of the administration’s most powerful players in an ascent that rankles conservatives.

As director of the National Economic Council (NEC), Cohn, 56, is a key administration link to globalist business elites and White House sources say he will lead the charge for Trump on top domestic priorities such as tax reform, infrastructure, and deregulation.

Dina Powell

Another rising star in the west wing is President Trump’s newly appointed deputy national security adviser, Dina Powell who also came from Goldman Sachs where she was a partner. Ms. Powell was born in Cairo, Egypt, and an Arab speaker, emigrating with her parents to Texas at the age of four. Her father drove a bus and operated a convenience store in Dallas.

A graduate of Dallas’ prestigious Ursuline Academy, Powell attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she first got the political bug working in the state Senate. Her first internship was with then-Texas Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, a Republican, who’s kept up with her career through the years.

“She is extraordinary and she has gone so far since that first little internship because she is so graceful,” Hutchison told CNN, citing Powell’s positive attitude, diplomatic manner, and discretion. She has been a formal adviser to Ivanka Trump and Kushner and her husband is the president of Teneo Corporation, which has ties to the Clinton Foundation.

Steve Miller

Finally, Stephen Miller, 31, once thought to be a protégé of chief strategist Steve Bannon seems to have “gotten religion” and is now working with the moderates. Miller’s public profile, especially in the wake of the tumult over the travel ban he helped engineer, puts a target on his back—but also confirms how influential he has become in the early days of the Trump administration. He is now working on women’s issues with Ivanka despite having once forcefully argued against paid maternity leave and equal pay legislation.

Masonic generals behind missile strike on Syrian air base?

President Trump, as everyone is aware, has appointed several generals to top national security posts in his administration. As many Mason-watchers are aware, the military is rife with Freemasons and the same is true of the intelligence community. Since the times of the revolutionary war, this has been the case as each regiment of General Washington’s Continental Army had its own field lodge. Modern Mason-watchers have spoken of the great number of Masons in the field of law enforcement, but the number in the military and intelligence complex far exceeds even these numbers.

This being the case, we can look at the recent American airstrike against the Syrian air base in a new light. On Thursday evening, March 7, President Trump ordered an airstrike on an air base in Syria where he used 59 Tomahawk missiles to destroy military equipment to punish the Assad regime for supposedly using chemical weapons on its own people. He said he was provided evidence that Assad had planned this atrocity but did not make it available to the public. As most of us are aware, Russia is a major ally of Syria and has built large air and naval bases there and the country’s president Vladimir Putin has pledged Russian support for President Assad’s regime in its seven-year-long civil war.

Many of President Trump’s most ardent supporters, including this writer, were aghast at this volte-face on foreign policy. During the campaign, he distinguished himself by claiming he wanted to get along with Putin. His challenger Hillary Clinton tried every way she could to condemn the Russian leader, but Trump made it clear that he wanted better relations with him. Why the turn around?

Many experts blame his generals—those in the military and those retired generals working in this administration. Many believe these people have a predilection towards casting Putin as a villain and Russia as a threat. It’s as if hating Russia is in their genetic makeup and it is futile to argue with them about the subject.

There has been much talk lately about the “deep state”—a sort of state within the state, a sort of entrenched group of elites, of either party, Democrat of Republican, who hold great power and who will oppose those outside movements that want to change the status quo. It may be that these generals, many of them Freemasons, are part of this deep state and that they have allied themselves with their globalist comrades in the Trump government and have steered the president in the direction of opposition to Putin and a possible war with Russia which is completely opposed to what the president campaigned for. Maybe this deep state is not opposing the Trump administration. Perhaps Trump’s government has become part of the deep state.