When Hitler’s Favorite Waffen-SS Commando Leader Became an Irish Farmer

He was Hitler’s favourite commando, famously rescuing Mussolini from an Italian hilltop fortress, and was known as “the most dangerous man in Europe”.

After World War Two, he landed in Argentina and became a bodyguard for Eva Perón, with whom he was rumoured to have had an affair.

So when Otto Skorzeny arrived in Ireland in 1959, having bought a rural farmhouse in County Kildare, it caused much intrigue. At 6ft 4in and 18 stone, known as ‘scarface’ due to a distinctive scar on his left cheek, Skorzeny was an easily recognisable figure as he popped into the local post office.

In Irish press reports at the time Skorzeny was portrayed as a glamorous cloak and dagger figure, as Dublin-based journalist Kim Bielenberg recalls.
‘Military prowess’

 

“Skorzeny was depicted as the Third Reich’s Scarlet Pimpernel. The tone in newspaper articles was one of admiration rather than repulsion.

“He seemed to be admired for his military prowess,” he said.

But concerns about why this pin-up boy of the Nazi party had come to the country led to questions in the Irish parliament. What was Skorzeny doing there? Did he intend to start Nazi activities in Ireland?

Born in Vienna in 1908, Otto Skorzeny joined the Austrian Nazi party in the early 1930s. At the outbreak of WW2 he was initially involved in fighting on the Eastern Front, taking part in the German invasions of Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union.

‘Most dangerous man in Europe’

By April 1943, he had been made head of German special forces, in charge of a unit of elite SS commandos.

When Hitler’s ally Benito Mussolini was overthrown and imprisoned in Italy, Skorzeny was chosen by Hitler to lead the rescue mission.

Skorzeny and his men descended in gliders upon the remote Italian mountain-top hotel where Mussolini was held captive, overwhelming the Italian guards with the surprise attack and freeing the deposed dictator.

With this success, Skorzeny further enhanced his reputation with Hitler and was promoted to major.

He gained international renown when Mussolini was paraded in front of the media with Skorzeny at his side. Winston Churchill even described the mission as “one of great daring”.

He became the National Socialists go-to man for such operations. Another occurred in 1944 when Skorzeny and his men captured the son of the Hungarian regent, Admiral Horthy. Securing Miklós Horthy Jr after a brief fire fight, Skorzeny’s team then rolled him up in a carpet and put him on a plane to Berlin.

War crimes trial

Skorzeny’s last major mission in WW2 was during the Ardennes offensive (more commonly known as the Battle of the Bulge), in December 1944.

Skorzeny commanded Operation Greif, where English-speaking Germans dressed in American uniforms used disguised tanks to get behind Allied lines.

The plan caused confusion and panic among the Allies.

Rumours spread that Skorzeny’s men were planning to assassinate General Eisenhower, with the increased security leaving Eisenhower temporarily confined to his Versailles headquarters during Christmas week.

Ten days after Hitler took his own life in May 1945, Skorzeny surrendered to the Americans.

At Dachau in 1947 he stood trial for war crimes, but the case collapsed and Skorzeny was acquitted.

Skorzeny still had to answer charges from other countries and remained held as a prisoner of war. Typically, he escaped – with the help of former SS comrades.

He ended up in Madrid and set up an import/export agency. Although much of its business was legitimate, this was said to have been a front for Skorzeny’s involvement in organising the escape of wanted Nazis from Europe to South America.

Indisputably, Skorzeny made many trips to Argentina, where he met Argentinean President Juan Perón and even became a bodyguard to Perón’s wife Eva, reportedly foiling an attempt on her life.

Feted in Ireland

Skorzeny travelled from Madrid to Ireland in June 1957, where he had been invited to Portmarnock Country Club hotel in County Dublin.

Kim Bielenberg reflects on the welcome Skorzeny received at the reception held in his honour.

“He was feted by the Dublin social glitterati, including a young politician, Charles Haughey, who was later to become Ireland’s most controversial prime minister.”

“According to the Evening Press account, ‘the ballroom was packed with representatives of various societies, professional men and, of course, several TDs [parliamentary representatives]’,” the journalist said.

Bielenberg believes this warm welcome may have encouraged him to buy Martinstown House, a 160 acre farm and mansion in the Curragh, County Kildare, in 1959 and assesses the impression Skorzeny created with the locals.

“He could be seen driving across the Curragh in a white Mercedes and would visit the local post office for groceries.

“Reggie Darling, a local historian, told me he remembered coming across Skorzeny on the Curragh.

“He recalled him as a big man who stood out because of the scar across his face (which was the result of a duelling contest as a student), but that he wasn’t particularly friendly and he didn’t really mix with local people,” he said.

‘Escape route’

Rumours and conjecture surrounded Skorzeny’s regular visits to Ireland over the coming years.

Documents at the Irish National Archives in Dublin reveal that he was granted temporary visas to stay in Ireland, on the undertaking that he would not enter Britain.

State records from 1958 mention his indignation at the continual refusal of the British authorities to allow him entry.

Newspaper reports in the 1960s alleged that Skorzeny had opened up an escape route for ex-Nazis in Spain and that his farm in Ireland was a place where fleeing Nazis could hide, but no evidence was found to substantiate this claim.

Questions in the Dáil

In the post-war period, Europe was still haunted by the spectre of Nazism and there were concerns that it would return as a political force.

With that in mind, the former Irish minister for health Noel Browne was very concerned about Skorzeny’s presence in Ireland and raised the matter in the Irish parliament (Dáil), in 1959.

The minister expressed concern that Skorzeny was engaging in “anti-Semitic activities”.

On another occasion Browne told the Dáil: “It is generally understood that this man plays some part (in neo-Nazi activities) and, if so, he should not be allowed to use Ireland for that purpose.”

There were a number of memos and letters involving Irish government departments, such as the Department of Justice and the Department of External Affairs, addressing concerns about Skorzeny’s presence in Ireland.

When interviewed, Skorzeny denied that he was involved in Nazi activities or politics.

He said that he would like to buy horses and that one day he wished to retire to Ireland. But that did not happen and he was never granted a permanent Irish visa.

He lived out his remaining years in Madrid, where he died of cancer in 1975.

Skorzeny never denounced Natonal Socialism and was buried by his former comrades with his coffin draped in the National Socialist colours.

National Socialists in Ireland

In addition to Skorzeny, a number of high-profile Nazis, including Albert Folens and Helmut Clissman, came to Ireland in the aftermath of WW2.

In Hidden History: Ireland’s Nazis, a 2007 documentary by Irish state broadcaster RTÉ, presenter Cathal O’Shannon estimated that between 100 and 200 Nazis moved to Ireland.

O’Shannon, who was an Irish-born Royal Air Force (RAF) veteran, described how he felt that anti-British sentiment in Ireland led to Nazis receiving a warmer welcome than he did when he came home after the war.

Kim Bielenberg believes it is important to consider the context of the time.

“They must have felt reasonably welcome, and were probably left alone, or even feted, as Skorzeny was. I am not sure that the full horror of Nazi atrocities had sunk in in Ireland,” he said.

“There also may have been an attitude among certain nationalists that ‘my enemy’s enemy is my friend’. Irish attitudes to Nazis changed from the 1970s on, as issues such as the Holocaust entered public consciousness.”

Hitler assassination attempt

For Bielenberg there is also a personal link to Skorzeny, as he explains.

“Skorzeny was involved in rounding up and torturing members of the German resistance after their attempt on Hitler’s life. One of these plotters was my own grandfather, Fritz von der Schulenburg”, he said.

“After he was arrested with other resistance leaders, Skorzeny arrived and pulled off their military badges. The plotters were then forced to listen to a speech given by Hitler on the radio, confirming that the fuhrer was indeed still alive and well.

“My grandfather was executed in Berlin in August 1944.”

“My mother came to live in Ireland and married the son of Peter and Christabel Bielenberg, associates of senior resistance figures. She lived in the same county as Skorzeny.

“I only discovered the house’s past and the Skorzeny link when I went to dinner there with my German family just after her death.”

(BBC)

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Adolf Hitler – A Man Against Time

http://www.renegadetribune.com/adolf-hitler-man-time/
By Esoteric Truths

Adolf Hitler was a man who struggled and fought tirelessly for decades trying to secure a safe future for his people. Hitler devoted his life to an idea, an idea that would restore Germany to her former glory. Prior to the accession of the NSDAP, Germany was an impoverished, degenerate, and desolate wasteland which lacked the basic necessitates of life. That all changed, when in 1933, the NSDAP came to power and revitalized the formerly shattered and broken nation.

The international hyenas were shaking in their boots because they feared this revolution, which had liberated Germany from its chains, would spread across Europe. International Jewry panicked and could not allow this to happen; they pressured France and England to declare war on Germany for invading Poland. Hitler was forced into a war that he didn’t want because he had committed the ultimate atrocity: freeing his people from the grip of the Jew.

Throughout the war Hitler offered many peace proposals and all of them were rejected. Germany was fighting for its existence against the combined might of all of the industrial superpowers of the civilized world and would have came out on top had it not been for Hitler’s incompetent high command. International Jewry raped, murdered, and robbed Germany and her people of their honor and pride.

Germany, and the entire western world, are nothing more than provinces of the global Jewish empire that threatens to plunge the world into eternal darkness if not stopped. These internationalists who are currently destroying the world are the same people Hitler fought to the death to defeat. All of the problems of today’s world are a direct result of Hitler’s defeat; all of this could have been prevented had Germany won.

In 1918 there was nothing like an organised anti-Semitic feeling. I still remember the difficulties we encountered the moment we mentioned the word Jew. We were either confronted with dumb-struck faces or else met with lively antagonism.” – Adolf Hitler

Today we are engaged in a bitter struggle with an enemy that is using every tool in their arsenal to wipe us off the face of the earth. The odds might be stacked against us, but we must never give up and struggle until our final victory has been achieved. Hitler faced the same difficulties that we face today. Hitler showed us the way, showed us how we can free our people and our nations from the Jewish yoke. It has been done before, and it will be done again!

Remember the gallant sacrifice of the 300 Spartans and their Greek allies that fought to the last man against the Persian hordes that threatened to enslave and destroy their people. Never forget the brave Waffen SS volunteers who, despite the odds, fought to the death defending the Führerbunker to the last man knowing all was lost. The men that came before us faced many obstacles and challenges and, like them, we too must struggle and fight for our right to exist on this earth. Hitler may be gone, but his legacy will live on for eternity.

Adolf Hitler – Never Despair

http://www.renegadetribune.com/adolf-hitler-never-despair/

 

Let this video, posted on Adolf Hitler’s birthday, be an inspiration to you. We can accomplish amazing things if we work together tirelessly for our people. Heil Hitler!

The most precious possession you have in the world is your own people. And for this people, and for the sake of this people, we will struggle and fight.”

New book says Hitler was an indicted war criminal at death (LOL…..)

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — A new book that examines previously restricted files from the UN War Crimes Commission cites documents showing that Adolf Hitler had been indicted as a war criminal for actions by the Nazis during World War II before his death — contrary to longstanding assumptions.

The book, “Human Rights After Hitler” by British academic Dan Plesch, says Hitler was put on the commission’s first list of war criminals in December 1944, but only after extensive debate and formal charges brought by Czechoslovakia, which had been occupied by the Nazis.

The previous month the commission determined that Hitler could be held criminally responsible for the acts of the Nazis in occupied countries, according to the book. And by March 1945 — a month before Hitler’s death — “the commission had endorsed at least seven separate indictments against him for war crimes.”

Plesch, who led the campaign for open access to the commission’s archive, told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the documents show “the allies were prepared to indict Hitler as head of state, and this overturns a large part of what we thought we knew about him.”

A Dec. 15, 1944 document submitted to the commission by Czechoslovakia accuses Hitler and five members of “the Reich government,” including his deputy Rudolf Hess and Heinrich Himmler, one of the Nazis most responsible for the Holocaust, of crimes including “murder and massacres-systematic terrorism.” A photocopy is included in the book.

In this Oct. 6, 1938, file photo, Adolf Hitler, second from left, stands in front of the barbed wire fortifications at Kreuzbuche, Germany after German troops advanced and occupied the second zone of Sudetenland.  (AP, File)

The United Nations War Crimes Commission was established in October 1943 by 17 allied nations to issue lists of alleged war criminals — ultimately involving about 37,000 individuals — and examine the charges against them and try to assure their arrest and trial.

Its unrestricted records, related to more than 10,000 cases, were put online in July 2013 by the International Criminal Court after an agreement with the UN. Three months later, then US Ambassador Samantha Power announced that the restricted files — which contain some 30,000 sets of pre-trial documents submitted by national and military tribunals to the commission to judge whether a case should be pursued — would be given to the Holocaust Museum in Washington.

According to the book, legally certified documents, government transcripts and interviews with torture victims “prove beyond doubt” that the US and British governments were told about Hitler’s extermination camps in the early years of World War II.

Plesch said both governments acknowledged their existence but did almost nothing to stop the mass killings.

The earliest condemnations of Nazi atrocities were made in a joint statement by the Czech and Polish governments in November 1940.

In 1942, the American, British and Soviet governments led their allies in a public declaration “that explicitly condemned Hitler’s ongoing extermination of European Jews” and the book says that condemnation was far stronger than commonly believed.

“The records overturn one of the most important accepted truths concerning the Holocaust: that, despite the heroic efforts of escapees from Nazi-occupied Europe, the allies never officially accepted the reality of the Holocaust and therefore never condemned it until the camps were liberated at the end of the war,” Plesch wrote.

“The book documents not only that the extermination of the Jews was condemned officially and publicly by the allies but that specific features of the extermination were publicized, including a favored method — lethal gas — and the central place of execution — Poland,” he said.

Plesch wrote that it was beyond the scope of the book to assess why public condemnations of the extermination of Jews aren’t prominent in public and scholarly narratives of the Holocaust.

One possibility, he said, is that “significant parts of the governments in the United States and the United Kingdom were directly opposed to doing anything to help the Jews or to support war crimes prosecutions.”

Nonetheless, he cited material from the commission’s restricted archive which shows that hundreds of German “foot soldiers of atrocity” were indicted while the Holocaust was still underway by states where the crimes took place — and it shows that these national indictments were endorsed by the War Crimes Commission up to its final meetings before it was closed in March 1948.

One chapter analyzes country-by-country the indictments that began to be made early in 1944 for anti-Jewish persecution by Germans. It includes 372 cases submitted against Germany by Poland, 110 by the Netherlands, 91 by France, 52 by Czechoslovakia, 30 by Yugoslavia, 21 by the United Kingdom, 18 by Belgium, 14 by Denmark and 12 by Greece.

The book also notes cases brought against German allies Japan and Italy.

“Ultimately thousands of soldiers were tried for war crimes after World War II,” the book says. But Plesch wrote that “the commission’s files contain indictments against thousands of Nazis who were then allowed to go free.”

Yad Vashem says Spicer’s Hitler comments ‘distort history’

The Yad Vashem Holocaust museum on Wednesday said that White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s comments saying Nazi leader Adolf Hitler did not use chemical weapons “strengthen the hands of those whose goal is to distort history.”

In a statement, Yad Vashem expressed “deep concern regarding the inaccurate and insensitive use of terms related to the Holocaust by the White House Press Secretary.”

“His statements imply a profound lack of knowledge of events of the Second World War, including the Holocaust.”

The Jerusalem-based memorial center also invited the press secretary to visit its website in order to “learn about the Holocaust and its period in history.”

Visitors seen at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial museum in Jerusalem on January 27, 2015 (Hadas Parush/Flash90)

On Tuesday, Spicer stunned the Washington press corps by incorrectly telling reporters that Hitler did not use chemical weapons during World War II.

His words were an attempt to amplify the magnitude of assessments that Syrian strongman Bashar Assad used sarin gas in an assault last week on Khan Sheikhoun, a town in Syria’s Idlib province.

“We didn’t use chemical weapons in World War II,” Spicer said. “You know, you had someone as despicable as Hitler who didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons.”

Prompted to explain his initial comments, Spicer then issued a number of clarifications, saying he knew millions of Jews and other victims of the Nazis were killed in what he called “Holocaust centers” in Nazi-occupied Europe, many in gas chambers, but that “when it comes to sarin gas, [Hitler] was not using the gas on his people the same way that Ashad [sic] is doing.”

In a subsequent statement to reporters meant to clarify his remarks once again, he said, “In no way was I trying to lessen the horrendous nature of the Holocaust. I was trying to draw a distinction of the tactic of using airplanes to drop chemical weapons on population centers. Any attack on innocent people is reprehensible and inexcusable.”

Spicer apologized for his remarks later Tuesday.

“I was obviously trying to make a point about the heinous acts that Assad had made against his own people last week, using chemical weapons and gas, and frankly I mistakenly used an inappropriate, insensitive reference to the Holocaust — for which, frankly, there is no comparison,” he told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer.

“For that, I apologize. It was a mistake to do that.”

Spicer took pains to distance his boss, US President Donald Trump, from his comments.

“My comments today did not reflect the president’s, were a distraction from him and frankly were misstated, insensitive and wrong.” He added, “Obviously it was my blunder.”

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer listens to a question during a briefing at the White House April 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (AFP/ Brendan Smialowski)

Spicer’s comments drew a sharp rebuke from both US Jewish groups and politicians, including calls for his resignation from House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

The New York-based Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect also called on Trump to fire Spicer, saying he denied that Hitler gassed Jews during the Holocaust. Steven Goldstein, the center’s executive director, said in a statement that “on Passover no less,” Spicer had “engaged in Holocaust denial, the most offensive form of fake news imaginable, by denying Hitler gassed millions of Jews to death. Spicer’s statement is the most evil slur upon a group of people we have ever heard from a White House press secretary.

“President Trump must fire him at once.”

According to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Nazis experimented with poison gas in late 1939 with the killing of mental patients, which was termed “euthanasia.” Both mobile and stationary gas chambers were later used, with up to 6,000 Jews gassed each day at Auschwitz alone.

It’s not the first time the Trump administration has been criticized for comments related to the Holocaust and anti-Semitism. The White House released a statement on international Holocaust Remembrance Day earlier this year that did not make any reference to Jews, and some have taken issue with the slow speed with which Trump has condemned anti-Semitic attacks, including threats against Jewish community centers.

Germany denounces Spicer’s Hitler comparisons as bad idea

http://www.timesofisrael.com/germany-denounces-spicers-hitler-comparisons-as-bad-idea/

 

German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s spokesman on Wednesday said contemporary comparisons with Nazi atrocities were generally ill-advised, after White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer apologized for an “insensitive” analogy to Nazi leader Adolf Hitler.

“Any comparison of current situations with the crimes of National Socialism leads to nothing good,” the spokesman, Steffen Seibert, told reporters when asked about Spicer’s remarks.

On Tuesday, Spicer stunned the Washington press corps by incorrectly telling reporters that Hitler did not use chemical weapons during World War II.

His words were an attempt to illustrate the magnitude of assessments that Syrian strongman Bashar Assad used sarin gas in an assault last week on Khan Sheikhoun, a town in Syria’s Idlib province.

“We didn’t use chemical weapons in World War II,” Spicer said. “You know, you had someone as despicable as Hitler who didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons.”

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer waits for an interview to speak about a comparison he made between Syria's President Bashar Assad and Hitler during an earlier press briefing at the White House April 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (AFP Photo/Brendan Smialowski)

Prompted to explain his initial comments, Spicer then issued a number of clarifications, saying he knew millions of Jews and other victims of the Nazis were killed in what he called “Holocaust centers” in Nazi-occupied Europe, many in gas chambers, but that “when it comes to sarin gas, [Hitler] was not using the gas on his people the same way that Ashad [sic] is doing.”

In a subsequent statement to reporters meant to clarify his remarks once again, he said, “In no way was I trying to lessen the horrendous nature of the Holocaust. I was trying to draw a distinction of the tactic of using airplanes to drop chemical weapons on population centers. Any attack on innocent people is reprehensible and inexcusable.”

Spicer apologized for his remarks later Tuesday.

“I was obviously trying to make a point about the heinous acts that Assad had made against his own people last week, using chemical weapons and gas, and frankly I mistakenly used an inappropriate, insensitive reference to the Holocaust — for which, frankly, there is no comparison,” he told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer.

“For that, I apologize. It was a mistake to do that.”

Spicer took pains to distance his boss, US President Donald Trump, from his comments.

“My comments today did not reflect the president’s, were a distraction from him and frankly were misstated, insensitive and wrong.” He added, “Obviously it was my blunder.”

Spicer’s comments drew a sharp rebuke from both US Jewish groups and politicians, including calls for his resignation from House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and the New York-based Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect.

Also on Wednesday, the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum said that Spicer’s comments “strengthen the hands of those whose goal is to distort history.”

“His statements imply a profound lack of knowledge of events of the Second World War, including the Holocaust,” the Jerusalem based memorial center said, while also expressing its “deep concern regarding the inaccurate and insensitive use of terms related to the Holocaust by the White House Press Secretary.”

Visitors seen at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial museum in Jerusalem on January 27, 2015 (Hadas Parush/Flash90)

According to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Nazis experimented with poison gas in late 1939 with the killing of mental patients, which was termed “euthanasia.” Both mobile and stationary gas chambers were later used, with up to 6,000 Jews gassed each day at Auschwitz alone.

It’s not the first time the Trump administration has been criticized for comments related to the Holocaust and anti-Semitism. The White House released a statement on international Holocaust Remembrance Day earlier this year that did not make any reference to Jews, and some have taken issue with the slow speed with which Trump has condemned anti-Semitic attacks, including threats against Jewish community centers.

Spicer: ‘I let the president down’ over Hitler comments

http://www.timesofisrael.com/spicer-i-let-the-president-down-over-hitler-comments/

 

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer on Wednesday again tried to apologize for his comment that Nazi leader Adolf Hitler did not use chemical weapons during World War II, calling it an “inexcusable and reprehensible” mistake.

“I let the president down,” the White House spokesperson said, adding that his comments distracted from “an unbelievable couple of weeks” for US President Donald Trump.

“This was mine to own, mine to apologize for,” said Spicer who has been lambasted for his comments and several failed attempts to clarify his remarks that just got him into even further trouble.

Speaking at a forum at the Newseum in Washington, DC, Spicer also appeared to apologize for making the remarks during both the Jewish holiday of Passover and Holy Week before Easter.

“It is a very holy week for both the Jewish people and the Christian people and this is not [just] to make a gaffe, a mistake like this is inexcusable and reprehensible,” he said.

“And so of all weeks, this compounds that kind of mistake.”

Spicer also said that it was inappropriate of him to draw a comparison between Hitler and Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Syrian dictator Bashar Assad (L) and Nazi leader Adolf Hitler. (SANA via AP and German Federal Archive/Wikimedia Commons)

“I should not have tried to make a comparison. There is no comparing atrocities and it is a very solemn time for so many folks,” he said.

“I got into a topic that I shouldn’t have and I screwed up.”

“On both a personal level and a professional level that will go down as not a very good day in my history,” he added.

During the daily press briefing at the White House on Tuesday, Spicer stunned the Washington press corps by incorrectly telling reporters that Hitler did not use chemical weapons during World War II.

His words were an attempt to amplify the magnitude of assessments that Assad used sarin gas in an assault last week on Khan Sheikhoun, a town in Syria’s Idlib province.

“We didn’t use chemical weapons in World War II,” Spicer said. “You know, you had someone as despicable as Hitler who didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons.”

Prompted to explain his initial comments, Spicer then issued a number of clarifications, saying he knew millions of Jews and other victims of the Nazis were killed in what he called “Holocaust centers” in Nazi-occupied Europe, many in gas chambers, but that “when it comes to sarin gas, [Hitler] was not using the gas on his people the same way that Ashad [sic] is doing.”

In a subsequent statement to reporters meant to clarify his remarks once again, he said, “In no way was I trying to lessen the horrendous nature of the Holocaust. I was trying to draw a distinction of the tactic of using airplanes to drop chemical weapons on population centers. Any attack on innocent people is reprehensible and inexcusable.”

Spicer apologized for his remarks later Tuesday.

Spicer’s comments drew a sharp rebuke from both US Jewish groups and politicians, including calls for his resignation from House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and the New York-based Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect.

Also on Wednesday, the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum said that Spicer’s comments “strengthen the hands of those whose goal is to distort history.”

“His statements imply a profound lack of knowledge of events of the Second World War, including the Holocaust,” the Jerusalem-based memorial center said, while also expressing its “deep concern regarding the inaccurate and insensitive use of terms related to the Holocaust by the White House Press Secretary.”

TRUMP SPOKESMAN SPICER ISSUES APOLOGY FOLLOWING HITLER COMPARISON

 

WASHINGTON – White House spokesman Sean Spicer triggered an uproar on Tuesday by saying Adolf Hitler did not use chemical weapons. He apologized after his comments drew immediate criticism on social media and elsewhere for overlooking the fact that millions of Jews were killed in Nazi gas chambers.

Spicer made the assertion at a daily news briefing, during a discussion about the April 4 chemical weapons attack in Syria that killed 87 people. Washington has blamed the attack on the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

“You had someone as despicable as Hitler who didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons,” Spicer said when asked about Russia’s alliance with the Syrian government.

The Nazis murdered six million Jews during World War Two. Many Jews as well as others were killed in gas chambers in European concentration camps.

When a reporter asked Spicer if he wanted to clarify his comments, he said: “I think when you come to sarin gas, there was no, he was not using the gas on his own people the same way that Assad is doing.”

Later on Tuesday, Spicer apologized and said he should not have made that comparison.

“It was a mistake. I shouldn’t have done it and I won’t do it again,” Spicer told CNN in an interview. “It was inappropriate and insensitive.”

Spicer’s assertion, made during the Jewish holiday of Passover, sparked instant outrage on social media and from some Holocaust memorial groups who accused him of minimizing Hitler’s crimes.

“Sean Spicer now lacks the integrity to serve as White House press secretary, and President Trump must fire him at once,” said Steven Goldstein, executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect.

Shortly after the White House briefing, Spicer emailed a statement to reporters in response to their queries, but had stopped short of offering an explicit apology.

“In no way was I trying to lessen the horrendous nature of the Holocaust. I was trying to draw a distinction of the tactic of using airplanes to drop chemical weapons on population centers. Any attack on innocent people is reprehensible and inexcusable,” Spicer said in the statement.

The US Holocaust Museum did not mention Spicer’s comments directly, but sent out a tweet shortly after the briefing that showed graphic footage of dead bodies US forces found while liberating the Buchenwald concentration camp.

The video was retweeted more than a thousand times, with many Twitter users referencing Spicer’s comments.

US House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi called on Republican President Donald Trump to reject Spicer’s assertion.

“Sean Spicer must be fired, and the President must immediately disavow his spokesman’s statements,” Pelosi said in a statement.

The White House did not immediately respond when asked to comment on Pelosi’s statement.

It was not the first time the White House has had to answer questions about the Holocaust. Critics in January noted the administration’s statement marking International Holocaust Remembrance Day, which omitted any mention of Jewish victims.

At the time, Spicer defended that statement by saying it had been written in part by a Jewish staff member whose family members had survived the Holocaust.

Sean Spicer (White Freemason, White Idiot): Even Hitler didn’t use chemical weapons

http://thehill.com/homenews/news/328306-spicer-even-hitler-didnt-use-chemical-weapons

 

White House press secretary Sean Spicer caused an uproar on Tuesday when he said that Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, whose regime gassed millions of Jews during the Holocaust, did not use chemical weapons during World War II.

Spicer stumbled while trying to make a point about Syrian President Bashar Assad, who is accused of employing chemical weapons against his citizens. Russia’s government has backed Assad.

“We did not use chemical weapons in World War II. You had someone as despicable as Hitler who did not even sink to using chemical weapons,” Spicer said. “If you are Russia, ask yourself, is this a country and regime that you want to align yourself with?”

Given an opportunity to clarify his comments, Spicer misspoke again by trying once more to draw a distinction between Assad and Hitler, whom the press secretary said did not gas “his own people.”

“When it comes to sarin gas, [Hitler] was not using the gas on his own people the same way that Assad is doing,” Spicer said to audible groans from some reporters. He also referred to concentration camps as “Holocaust centers.”

“I understand your point. Thank you. I appreciate that. He brought them into the Holocaust centers, I understand that. I was saying in the way that Assad used them where he went into town, dropped them into the middle of town. I appreciate the clarification. That was not the intent.”

After the briefing, Spicer clarified his comments again on Twitter.

“In no way was I trying to lessen the horrendous nature of the Holocaust,” the spokesman said. “I was trying to draw a distinction of the tactic of using airplanes to drop chemical weapons on population centers. Any attack on innocent people is reprehensible and inexcusable.”

The remarks were widely mocked by Democrats and criticized by groups such as the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, which called for Spicer to be fired.

“On Passover no less, Sean Spicer has engaged in Holocaust denial, the most offensive form of fake news imaginable, by denying Hitler gassed millions of Jews to death,” said Steven Goldstein, executive director of the Anne Frank Center.

Spicer’s remarks drew rebukes from numerous lawmakers, including Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), who is Jewish.

Spicer’s remarks are likely to raise speculation about his job future. The press secretary has repeatedly stumbled at the podium, most memorably the day after President Trump’s inauguration, when he falsely claimed that more people attended it than any previous inauguration

The comments about Hitler were particularly damaging given criticisms that the White House has not done enough to fight anti-Semitism.

The White House failed to mention Jews in a late January statement marking Holocaust Remembrance Day. During a February news conference, Trump told a Jewish reporter to sit down after he asked about threats against Jewish Community Centers.

The president made his first public condemnation of the incidents five days later.

The gaffe prevented Spicer from truly augmenting the White House’s message on Syria, even as Secretary of State Rex Tillerson landed in Moscow for high-level meetings.

Spicer was trying to pressure Russia to abandon Assad, whom U.S. officials have accused of launching the sarin gas attack earlier this month that provoked Trump to retaliate with a missile strike on a Syrian airfield.

German historian: Hitler had a Jewish landlord

(JTA) — Adolf Hitler had a Jewish landlord, a German historian says.

Hitler lived in a home in Munich that was owned by a Jewish merchant between the years 1920 and 1929, according to Paul Hoser. Hitler spent one of those years in Landsberg prison for his and his Nazi Party’s failed coup attempt known as the Beer Hall Putsch, in 1923 in Munich in the German state of Bavaria.

Hoser, in a quarterly journal issued by the Institute for Contemporary History, known as VfZ, identified the landlord as Hugo Erlanger. He also reported that Hitler treated his landlord “with courtesy,” the Associated Press reported, citing report on the research in Der Spiegel magazine.

According to Hoser’s research, Erlanger lost the house in 1934, after falling behind on mortgage payments but recovered it in 1949 after surviving World War II.