Evils of Feminism

Haley slams UN for electing Congo to rights council despite abuses

The United States and human rights groups sharply criticized Monday’s UN election for 15 new members of the Human Rights Council, singling out conflict-torn Congo’s victory despite accusations of serious rights abuses and an investigation by the UN’s top human rights body.

US Ambassador Nikki Haley called the election “yet another example of why the Human Rights Council lacks credibility and must be reformed in order to be saved.”

Haley previously dangled the possibility that the United States could quit the council during a visit to its Geneva headquarters in June, when she lambasted the 47-nation body as a “forum for politics, hypocrisy and evasion” that allows rights abusers to whitewash their images and foes of Israel to criticize the Jewish state unfairly.

In a statement after the 193-member General Assembly voted Congo onto the Human Rights Council as part of an uncontested African slate for a three-year term starting Jan. 1, Haley said the rights organization “cannot endure many more blows to its credibility before it is rendered absolutely meaningless.”

Haley called Congo “a country infamous for political suppression, violence against women and children, arbitrary arrest and detention, and unlawful killings and disappearances” and said its unopposed election is another spur to US-led efforts to reform the Human Rights Council.

She made no mention of a US withdrawal from the council. She said in June the United States wants to see two key reforms: the use of competitive elections to choose the council’s 47 members and removal of Israel as a permanent fixture on its agenda — the only country in the world that has a permanent spot.

Since 2007, Israel has been the only country whose alleged human rights abuses are regularly discussed in the framework of a single permanent item on the Council’s agenda.

“Countries that aggressively violate human rights at home should not be in a position to guard the human rights of others,” Haley said. “We need a unified voice of moral clarity with backbone and integrity to call out abusive governments. This election has once again proven that the Human Rights Council, as presently constituted, is not that voice.”

Louis Charbonneau, UN director at Human Rights Watch, called Congo’s election “a slap in the face to the many victims of the Congolese government’s grave abuses across the country.”

African countries had four candidates for their continent’s four seats on the council and Congo got the lowest number of votes — 151. But that was still far about the 97 votes needed to win a seat.

The relatively low total shows President Joseph Kabila’s Congo “is fast becoming a pariah state. If there had been competition, it probably would have lost,” Charbonneau said.

The only contested slate was in Asia where six countries vied for four seats. Nepal topped the vote, followed by Qatar and Pakistan. Afghanistan, which got 130 votes, beat out Malaysia by a single vote for the fourth seat. The Maldives also lost.Hillel Neuer, executive director of UN Watch, a Geneva-based rights group, singled out three of the winners — Congo, Qatar and Pakistan — for criticism, saying for the UN to elect them “as a world judge on human rights is like making a pyromaniac into the town fire chief.”

UNESCO Bombshell

Last week, the US State Department announced it was withdrawing from the United Nations Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), effective December 31, 2018, citing financial considerations, the need for reform and the organization’s “continuing anti-Israel bias.”

Haley recalled that, “In July, when UNESCO made its latest outrageous and politically based decision, designating the Old City of Hebron and the Tomb of the Patriarchs as part of Palestinian territory, the United States clearly stated that this decision would negatively affect our evaluation of our level of engagement with the organization.” The decision to withdraw from UNESCO, she indicated, represented the result of that evaluation.

Furthermore, she warned the UN of further US scrutiny, saying that Washington would “continue to evaluate all agencies within the United Nations system through the same lens.”

Haley added that the “extreme politicization” of UNESCO has become a “chronic embarrassment.”

“The Tomb of the Patriarchs decision was just the latest in a long line of foolish actions, which includes keeping Syrian dictator Bashar Assad on a UNESCO human rights committee even after his murderous crackdown on peaceful protestors,” she said. “Just as we said in 1984 when President Reagan withdrew from UNESCO, US taxpayers should no longer be on the hook to pay for policies that are hostile to our values and make a mockery of justice and common sense.”

Advertisements

CLINTON COMPARES RUSSIAN INTERFERENCE IN ELECTION TO 9/11 (LOL….)

Hillary Clinton has compared Russia’s alleged interference in the 2016 presidential election and her subsequent loss to Donald Trump with the devastation of 9/11.

“We have really well-respected security and intelligence veterans saying this was a kind of cyber 9/11 in the sense that it was a direct attack to American institutions,” Clinton said, referring to the terrorist attack orchestrated by al-Qaeda that killed nearly 3,000 people in New York City, Washington and outside of Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

“That may sound dramatic but we know they tried to recruit into election systems, not just social media propaganda,” she said on Sunday, at a talk streamed live byThe Guardian where she presented her book to the Southbank Centre’s London Literature Festival.

Clinton added that if she had been elected she would have called for an independent commission “to get to the bottom of it.”

For his part, President Donald Trump has yet to explicitly acknowledge Russia’s meddling in the election, despite special counsel Robert Mueller’s ongoing probe into the matter and the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia. Even Trump’s pick for ambassador to Russia, Jon Huntsman Jr., said at his Senate confirmation hearing there was “no question” Moscow interfered in the U.S. election.

The president has instead referred to it as a “hoax” and, in a recent interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity, as an “excuse used by the Democrats” to explain their defeat.

“[Trump] is still trying to please Putin” Clinton said at the London event, held in a 2554-seat auditorium that sold out within two hours of public sale and that greeted the first woman to become the presidential nominee of a major political party with a huge roar, applause and a standing ovation.

Clinton warned the threat to American democracy coming from Russia is not over and that the new cold war will be partially carried out through cyber attacks. “The Russians aren’t done, this is an ongoing threat and that is one of the reasons why I wrote the book and one of the reasons I’m talking about it,” she said.

HOW DID FRANCE’S AUDREY AZOULAY (FEMINIST KIKE) WIND UP AS THE NEW UNESCO CHIEF?

 

PARIS – Audrey Azoulay’s election Friday night as UNESCO’s next director-general marks an unexpected victory for French diplomacy.

Her name first came up as candidate for the spot at the twilight of François Hollande’s presidency when she served as culture minister.

But the end of Hollande’s political career risked ending her political ambitions, as well, as new the new president, Emmanuel Macron, found himself in an uncomfortable position with a candidate he did not choose, to a post he did not seek.

In fact, countries hosting UN agency headquarters rarely seek to also conquer the agencies’ leadership.

Still, Macron took it upon himself personally to advance Azoulay’s candidacy – a gamble that paid off.

The battle over UNESCO’s top post was dramatic, to say the least.

Several voting rounds reduced the seven-name list into five, positioning Qatar at the head with 22 votes and Egypt and France in second place with 18 votes each.

France defeated Egypt in the special duel on Friday afternoon, bringing Azoulay to face Qatar’s Hamad Bin Abdulaziz al-Kawari in the final vote.

French diplomats admit their goal from the very beginning was to reach the final stretch – second place. That, in itself, would have been viewed by Paris as an honorable achievement considering that France started campaigning for its candidate very late in the game.

Arab countries started campaigning much earlier – and not only specifically for their four candidates, but also for an Arab candidate, in general.

UNESCO has been headed for many years by European or North Americans, they claimed, so it was time for an Arab figure to take up this international post. Egypt was actually counting on its candidate being the first Arab, first African and first Muslim woman to ever head UNESCO – you cannot get more politically correct than that.

But the fact that the Arabs had four candidates to begin with worked against them.

With the backdrop of the Qatari-Saudi Arabia rift, strong anti-Qatar sentiments within the Arab world worked against the Qatari candidate. More so, rumors about Qatar applying pressure on poor African countries to vote in favor of its candidate portrayed a negative image of a rich country using its financial means to land a prestigious international post.

It worked for a while, perhaps, but not until the very end.

France wasn’t the only one facing Arab internal havoc, however.

China, for instance, also could have profited from this Arab split, but its candidate received just five votes in an early stage of the voting.

The “Macron effect” came into action with Azoulay benefiting from Macron’s popularity in the global arena and his fresh, determined image.

The US decision to pull out of UNESCO also played also into the hands of Paris, enhancing the “Macron effect.”

To the international community, Macron represents the exact opposite of US President Donald Trump – he is young, level headed, champions collective diplomacy and respects the international bodies, which is exactly what the doctor prescribed for UNESCO at this time of crisis when its credibility and budgets are at rock bottom.

It is no secret that Jerusalem preferred anybody but the Qatari candidate to head UNESCO. The Americans’ decision to pull out and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s intention to follow suit apparently directed Jerusalem’s attention away from the UNESCO vote.

It is only now, with one foot out of door, that Jerusalem is beginning to consider what Azoulay’s election actually means for Israel.

KELLY CLARKSON (WHITE SLUT, WHITE TRASH, WHITE FEMINIST) GOES FULL FANGIRL OVER GAL GADOT (FEMINIST KIKE)

 

http://www.jpost.com/International/Watch-Kelly-Clarkson-go-full-fangirl-over-Gal-Gadot-507438

 

Kelly Clarkson, American pop star and voice coach on The Voice, spoke at Variety’s Power of Women L.A. luncheon on Friday and honored Israeli actress Gal Gadot as a “bold female figure.”

According to Variety, Clarkson stopped mid speech about her work in education with the organization XQ Institute to call out Wonder Woman as a role model for young girls like her daughter.

She went full fangirl and said, “B*tch got it all,” utilizing the word in the positive form in reference to Gadot.

Clarkson went on to praise Director Patty Jenkins and criticize James Cameron for his comments on the film Wonder Woman being a step back.

“I love this movie, I don’t know what James Cameron is talking about.”

Clarkson referenced a variety of Disney princesses in her mid-speech gush session.

“For women that are moms, the story of Belle and the beast [from Beauty and the Beast]… it’s a little scary. She was in a dungeon, trapped, and then they fell in love… Or Aurora [from Sleeping Beauty]… she just slept it out; she didn’t do a damn thing… And I’m like ‘ughhh.’”

Clarkson is proud that her daughter can grow up in world with a princess famous for strength. “You’re a little proud cause you’re like, ‘Oh, you’re cute in the Belle dress,’ but you’re more proud when she’s like [wields imaginary Wonder Woman sword].”

Gal Gadot was this summer’s queen of the box office, and her film, Wonder Woman, was its highest grossing film and the second highest grossing film of 2017. These successes merited the announcement of a sequel, Wonder Woman 2, which is to premier in December 2019.

Wonder Woman is also the first live-action movie directed by a woman to gross more than $400 million in the United States and $800 million world-wide.

French Jewish candidate defeats Qatari to win UNESCO leadership

PARIS, France — France’s former culture minister Audrey Azoulay was elected to head UNESCO after a cliffhanger vote on Friday evening.

By a margin of 30-28 votes, Azoulay, the first Jewish UNESCO head, narrowly defeated Qatari candidate Hamad bin Abdulaziz Al-Kawari, who had been the frontrunner throughout the week’s voting.

Azoulay, 45, came from behind after six rounds of voting to defeat Al-Kawari, also a former culture minister, after he failed to pick up support from other Gulf states that are part of a Saudi-led coalition blockading Qatar.

The election to head the UN’s embattled culture and education agency took place a day after the US quit the body, accusing it of anti-Israel bias.

“In a time of crisis, we need more than ever to get involved (and) work to strengthen the organization,” Azoulay said after her election Friday.

Azoulay is the daughter of André Azoulay, adviser to King Mohammed VI of Morocco. She grew up in Morocco and France.

The politically charged campaign to succeed UNESCO’s outgoing chief Irina Bokova was overshadowed by Washington’s announcement Thursday that it planned to withdraw from the body after years of tensions over decisions seen as critical of Israel. Israel itself announced shortly afterwards that it would follow suit.

Arab states had argued that the job of director-general of the 195-member organization should go to one of them for the first time, but regional tensions complicated the task.

In an intermediate vote on Friday afternoon, the 58 members of the Executive Board had preferred the French candidate to the Egyptian Moushira Khattab, by 31 votes to 25 (two blank votes), to face Al-Kawari in the final round.

Arab states have been divided between backers of oil-rich Qatar and its poorer rival Egypt, which is part of a Saudi-led coalition that has been blockading Qatar since June over its alleged support for radical Islamists and ties to Iran.

Arab divisions

In the face of Arab divisions, France presented Azoulay as a consensus figure who could mend fences within the organization and sooth tensions caused by recent resolutions against Israel.

“Now more than ever UNESCO needs a project… which restores confidence and overcomes political divisions,” the foreign ministry said in a statement reacting to the US pullout.

Lebanon’s candidate Vera El-Khoury, who bowed out at an earlier stage in the voting, told AFP that the power game at play in the race had shown UNESCO members “did not give a damn” about the candidates’ programs.

Qatar has lobbied intensely for the post — and has increased its financial contribution to support UNESCO in recent years — but its candidate was dogged by old allegations of anti-Semitism.

He has notably been accused by the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which combats anti-Semitism, of remaining silent over the presence of anti-Semitic books at a fair in Doha when he was culture minister.

This is not the first time the US — a founding member — has walked out on the 195-member UNESCO, best known for producing a list of World Heritage sites including tourist favorites such as the Grand Canyon or Cambodia’s Angkor Wat.

The US decision, which is to take effect on December 31, 2018, underlined America’s drift away from international institutions under President Donald Trump.

The agency’s outgoing head, Bulgaria’s Irina Bokova, told French radio that UNESCO’s “universal mission was in jeopardy.”

US State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the decision to leave reflected “US concerns with mounting arrears at UNESCO, the need for fundamental reform in the organisation, and continuing anti-Israel bias.”

Ex-president Ronald Reagan first pulled the US out in 1984 over alleged financial mismanagement and claims of anti-US bias in some of its policies.

Washington returned to the fold in 2002, seeing UNESCO as a vehicle for combatting extremism in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks.

But in 2011 relations soured again after UNESCO admitted Palestine as a full member, prompting the US to cut its funding to the organization, leaving a gaping hole in its finances.

The rift continued to fester in recent years, with the organization becoming the scene of repeated diplomatic flare-ups after efforts led by Arab countries to pass resolutions critical of Israel that have denied Jewish historical ties to Jerusalem, Hebron.

Welcomed in Israel, new French Jewish head of UNESCO won’t mean immediate change

Minutes after France’s former culture minister Audrey Azoulay was elected to head UNESCO on Friday evening, Israel’s Minister of Intelligence Yisrael Katz, a member of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s governing Likud party, was asked whether her victory over the Qatari candidate for the post might prompt Israel to reconsider its decision Thursday to join the US in withdrawing from the UN body.

Katz, who was in the Channel 2 TV studio to comment on President Donald Trump’s Iran speech, was momentarily taken aback. “Don’t expect UNESCO to suddenly now become a Zionist organization,” he retorted. But then he reflected a little, and added, “If it does change its policy,” he said, then “certainly” Israel might reconsider.

Azoulay’s path to the leadership of UNESCO was paved by a division in the Arab world. Egypt and Qatar both fielded candidates for the post, and Azoulay eventually squeezed past both of them over six tortuous rounds of voting.

For Israel, Azoulay’s victory is plainly a cause for celebration. She is the first Jewish head of UNESCO, and, Channel 2 reported, has relatives in Israel.

At the same time, the accuracy of Katz’s waspish retort that UNESCO would not now automatically change its nature is reflected in the fact that the outgoing UNESCO chief, Irina Bukova, was a firm critic of some of her own organization’s anti-Israel resolutions.

Rapid rise

When Azoulay, then number two at France’s National Cinema Centre, was named culture minister last year, she barely had a public profile — she didn’t even have a Twitter account.

Azoulay declared her last-minute candidacy to lead UNESCO, the UN’s cultural body, in March, saying that “France was perfectly legitimate on the subject of culture, education and sciences.”That was quickly rectified as the career civil servant, long used to working behind the scenes in the higher spheres of French administrations, got her first exposure to the brights lights of politics.

But she was not able to campaign fully until leaving her post after President Emmanuel Macron named a new government following his election in May.

During her tenure of just over a year as culture minister under leftist president Francois Hollande, Azoulay secured a budget increase for her ministry after years of deep cuts.

Her tenure was also marked by the passage of a “creation and heritage” law aimed at ensuring artistic freedom and protecting France’s myriad historic sites, the culmination of years of efforts.

Defender of French films

Azoulay was born in Paris on August 4, 1972, into a Moroccan Jewish family, originally from Essaouira, which gave pride of place to books and debate.

She studied at Sciences-Po university in Paris and at Lancaster University in Britain before graduating from France’s ENA, an elite school that grooms France’s future leaders.Her father is Andre Azoulay, a banker and adviser to the Morocco’s King Mohammed VI — as he was to the king’s father, Hassan II — and her mother is the writer Katia Brami.

During her studies she worked in banking, an experience she said she “hated.”

She spent time at France’s Court of Audits and several years in various media departments at the Culture Ministry, before joining the CNC, guardian of the French film industry, as financial director in 2006.

By 2011 she had become deputy director at the CNC, making her a key player in the structure which regulates the industry and doles out subsidies for French productions.

“It’s the film industry that formed me the most professionally,”said Azoulay, who has also been a staunch defender of the French industry’s “cultural exception” against the Hollywood juggernaut.

“She is a brilliant and passionate woman, a friend of artists and creativity,” CNC president Frederique Bredin said in 2014, when she was tapped to become Hollande’s culture and communications adviser, on her way to the top post at the Culture Ministry.

Path to victory

Azoulay, 45, came from behind after six rounds of voting to defeat Qatari candidate Hamad bin Abdulaziz Al-Kawari, also a former culture minister, after he failed to pick up support from other Gulf states that are part of a Saudi-led coalition blockading Qatar.

The election to head the UN’s embattled culture and education agency took place a day after the US quit the body, accusing it of anti-Israel bias.

The politically charged campaign to succeed Bokova was overshadowed by Washington’s announcement Thursday that it planned to withdraw from the body after years of tensions over decisions seen as critical of Israel. Israel itself announced shortly afterwards that it would follow suit.

Arab states had argued that the job of director-general of the 195-member organization should go to one of them for the first time, but regional tensions complicated the task.

In an intermediate vote on Friday afternoon, the 58 members of the Executive Board had preferred the French candidate to the Egyptian Moushira Khattab, by 31 votes to 25 (two blank votes), to face Al-Kawari in the final round.

Arab states have been divided between backers of oil-rich Qatar and its poorer rival Egypt, which is part of a Saudi-led coalition that has been blockading Qatar since June over its alleged support for radical Islamists and ties to Iran.

In the face of Arab divisions, France presented Azoulay as a consensus figure who could mend fences within the organization and sooth tensions caused by recent resolutions against Israel.

“Now more than ever UNESCO needs a project… which restores confidence and overcomes political divisions,” the French foreign ministry said in a statement reacting to the US pullout.

Lebanon’s candidate Vera El-Khoury, who bowed out at an earlier stage in the voting, said the power game at play in the race had shown UNESCO members “did not give a damn” about the candidates’ programs.

Qatar lobbied intensely for the post — and has increased its financial contribution to support UNESCO in recent years — but its candidate was dogged by old allegations of anti-Semitism.

Al-Kawari has notably been accused by the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which combats anti-Semitism, of remaining silent over the presence of anti-Semitic books at a fair in Doha when he was culture minister.

This is not the first time the US — a founding member — has walked out on the 195-member UNESCO, best known for producing a list of World Heritage sites including tourist favorites such as the Grand Canyon or Cambodia’s Angkor Wat.

The US decision, which is to take effect on December 31, 2018, underlined America’s drift away from international institutions under President Donald Trump.

The agency’s outgoing head, Bulgaria’s Bokova, told French radio that UNESCO’s “universal mission was in jeopardy.”

US State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the decision to leave reflected “US concerns with mounting arrears at UNESCO, the need for fundamental reform in the organisation, and continuing anti-Israel bias.”

Ex-president Ronald Reagan first pulled the US out in 1984 over alleged financial mismanagement and claims of anti-US bias in some of its policies.

Washington returned to the fold in 2002, seeing UNESCO as a vehicle for combatting extremism in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks.

But in 2011 relations soured again after UNESCO admitted Palestine as a full member, prompting the US to cut its funding to the organization, leaving a gaping hole in its finances.

The rift continued to fester in recent years, with the organization becoming the scene of repeated diplomatic flare-ups after efforts led by Arab countries to pass resolutions critical of Israel that have denied Jewish historical ties to Jerusalem, Hebron.

A doctor shouted at a sick mother to ‘get the hell out.’ Now he’s under criminal investigation.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/10/12/a-doctor-shouted-at-a-sick-mother-to-get-the-hell-out-now-hes-under-criminal-investigation/?utm_term=.df9c99921a8d

 

A doctor in northern Florida is under criminal investigation after he was seen on video shouting at a patient to “get the hell out” of an urgent-care clinic, then apparently grabbing her daughter’s cellphone, which was recording the incident.

Peter Gallogly, a physician at Gainesville After-Hours Clinic, was captured on video Monday arguing with a patient who was scolding him for a long wait time.

“Are you kidding me?” Gallogly shouted at the patient, Jessica Stipe, reminding her that he had already tested her urine. “Does that take three seconds, you think?”

“I don’t know how long it takes,” Stipe said.

“Do you want to be seen or not?” he replied.

Stipe told the doctor that she was “miserable” and just wanted to “go home and get in my bed.”

“Fine,” Gallogly responded, “then get the hell out. Get your money and get the hell out.”

When Stipe told him he was being rude, he shouted: “Get the f— out of my office. Now.”

Stipe’s daughter, who was recording the incident on a cellphone, then asked the doctor for his name. He appeared to snatch the cellphone out of her hand and walk away with it, saying, “You’re recording this?”

Gainesville police spokesman Ben Tobias told The Washington Post that officers responded to the incident and have opened a criminal investigation into the case.

Stipe posted the video Monday night on Facebook, writing that she had made an appointment for 6:30 p.m. Stipe, who said she was “in severe pain and throwing up in the trash can,” had still not been seen at 7:45 p.m.

She said she requested that her co-pay be returned to her so she could go home to bed and then seek treatment elsewhere the next day. She said the doctor was “mad” and “when he saw it was being recorded he snatched my baby’s phone and shoved her when she tried to get it back.”

A person who answered the phone at the Gainesville After-Hours Clinic on Thursday declined to comment, but a statement on the medical center’s Facebook page states that there was more to the exchange.

Gallogly, the physician, wrote that the video shows only the final moments of an hour-long argument, claiming that throughout her time in the clinic, Stipe had become “increasingly belligerent and abusive to the office staff, cursing them and threatening them with violence, because she was unwell and had been waiting to be seen by me for more than an hour.”

He said that even after Stipe’s co-payment had been returned to her, she would not leave.

When he walked into the waiting room to speak with her, he said, Stipe and her daughter “cursed and threatened me as they had done with the office staff previously.”

“At the very end of the events,” he said in the statement, “I most regrettably lost my temper, and spoke to the women in a most unprofessional manner. I make no excuses for my unacceptable behavior.”

The urgent care clinic also appeared to post an incident report and written testimonies from witnesses, but Gainesville police would not confirm whether those were legitimate police documents.

After the video spread throughout social media, Stipe said in a statement Tuesday that she was still sick and tired but wanted to set the record straight.

“Yes I’m employed, I don’t do drugs & yes I wanted meds . . . a antibiotic!” she wrote. “To those of you who support me you have my heartfelt thanks . . . to those who know me . . . you know this was uncalled for & for those of you who don’t and are being rude and hateful to me and my child . . . god bless your hearts. I pray you and your kids are never in this situation . . . you may sing a different tune if you are.”

After UNESCO bombshell, US envoy Haley warns UN of more trouble ahead

Hours after the Trump administration announced the US would be withdrawing from UNESCO, the United States ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, warned the world body that all its agencies are under similar scrutiny.

The State Department announced Thursday that the US is withdrawing from the United Nations Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), effective December 31, 2018, citing financial considerations, the need for reform and the organization’s “continuing anti-Israel bias.” The Israeli government promptly announced that it would follow suit.

In a statement later Thursday, Ambassador Haley recalled that, “In July, when UNESCO made its latest outrageous and politically based decision, designating the Old City of Hebron and the Tomb of the Patriarchs as part of Palestinian territory, the United States clearly stated that this decision would negatively affect our evaluation of our level of engagement with the organization.” Thursday’s decision to withdraw from UNESCO, she indicated, represented the result of that evaluation.

Furthermore, she warned, “The United States will continue to evaluate all agencies within the United Nations system through the same lens.”

Haley added that, “The purpose of UNESCO is a good one. Unfortunately, its extreme politicization has become a chronic embarrassment. The Tomb of the Patriarchs decision was just the latest in a long line of foolish actions, which includes keeping Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad on a UNESCO human rights committee even after his murderous crackdown on peaceful protestors. Just as we said in 1984 when President Reagan withdrew from UNESCO, US taxpayers should no longer be on the hook to pay for policies that are hostile to our values and make a mockery of justice and common sense.”

In June, ahead of a trip to Israel, Haley said the US could withdraw from the UN Human Rights Council unless it carried out reforms, including by removing its built-in procedural mechanism to bash Israel.

Haley said the Council’s “relentless, pathological campaign” against a state with a strong human rights record “makes a mockery not of Israel, but of the Council itself.”

In a speech to the Graduate Institute of Geneva, Haley said that if the Human Rights Council failed to make the required changes, the US would consider quitting the body and looking for ways to promote human rights in different frameworks.

The Council, she said, needs to abolish the infamous Agenda Item 7 (“the human rights situation in Palestine and other occupied Arab territories”), which singles out Israel for perpetual censure. “There is no legitimate human rights reason for this agenda item to exist,” Haley said. “It is the central flaw that turns the Human Rights Council from an organization that can be a force for universal good, into an organization that is overwhelmed by a political agenda.”

Since 2007, Israel has been the only country whose alleged human rights abuses are regularly discussed in the framework of a single permanent item on the Human Rights Council’s agenda. Eliminating Agenda Item 7 would not mean that Israel was free from criticism, Haley noted, explaining that claims against the Jewish state could still be discussed under Agenda Item 4, where complaints against other states are dealt with. But Israel needs to be put on an “equal footing” with all other states, she said.

“The Council is no more justified in having a separate agenda item on Israel than it is on having one for the United States, or Canada, or France, or the United Kingdom. More appropriate would be to have an agenda item on North Korea, Iran, and Syria, the world’s leading violators of human rights,” she said.

“These changes are the minimum necessary to resuscitate the Council as a respected advocate of universal human rights,” she went on. The US “will not sit quietly while this body, supposedly dedicated to human rights, continues to damage the cause of human rights,” she warned.

Since the Human Rights Council was created, it has passed more than 70 resolutions criticizing Israel but only seven on Iran, Haley said. “This relentless, pathological campaign against a country that actually has a strong human rights record makes a mockery not of Israel, but of the Council itself.”

In that same speech in June, Haley also slammed the effort to create a blacklist of Israel companies that operate in the settlements.

“The Council’s effort to create a database designed to shame companies for doing business in Israeli-controlled areas is just the latest in this long line of shameful actions,” she said.

“Blacklisting companies without even looking at their employment practices or their contributions to local empowerment, but rather based entirely on their location in areas of conflict is contrary to the laws of international trade and to any reasonable definition of human rights. It is an attempt to provide an international stamp of approval to the anti-Semitic BDS movement. It must be rejected.”

Without these two reforms — keeping the worst human rights offenders off the Council and ending its endemic anti-Israel bias — the US will consider quitting the 47-member body, she indicated.

While America does not seek to leave the Human Rights Council, it will do so if it fails to re-establish its legitimacy, she said. “Let the world be on notice: We will never give up the cause of universal human rights. Whether it’s here, or in other venues, we will continue this fight,” she said.

Earlier that same day, Haley addressed the body directly at the opening of its three-week summer session in Geneva, saying it was “essential that this council address its chronic anti-Israel bias if it is to have any credibility.”

Voicing concerns about the Council’s effectiveness, Haley said the US was “looking carefully at this council and our participation in it.”

But while Trump chastised the United Nations, he also said then that the United States would “pledge to be partners in your work” in order to make the UN “a more effective force” for peace across the globe.Last month, with Haley alongside him, US President Donald Trump made his debut appearance at the United Nations at a forum devoted to the issue of reforming the UN. He urged the organization to reduce bureaucracy and costs while more clearly defining its mission around the world.

The United States is the largest contributor to the UN budget, reflecting its position as the world’s largest economy. It pays 25 percent of the UN’s regular operating budget and over 28 percent of the separate peacekeeping budget — a level of spending that Trump has complained is unfair.

The Trump administration has been conducting a review of the UN’s 16 far-flung peacekeeping operations, which cost nearly $8 billion a year. Haley has said that cutting their costs and making them more effective is a top priority.

‘HW raped me,’ says actress Rose McGowan, Harvey Weinstein accuser

NEW YORK (AP) — After a suspension earlier in the day from Twitter, actress Rose McGowan forcefully re-emerged Thursday, stating more frankly what she has long suggested: “HW raped me.”

“HW” was apparently in reference to Harvey Weinstein, the embattled former Weinstein Co. co-chairman.

“Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein,” Weinstein’s representative Sallie Hofmeister said Thursday.

McGowan last year said that she had been raped by a “studio head.” The New Yorker expose that ran Tuesday reported that Weinstein had allegedly sexually assaulted three women, though the third woman was unnamed. The New York Times earlier reported that Weinstein paid a financial settlement of $100,000 to McGowan in 1997 over an incident in a hotel room at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah.

The Summit County Sheriff’s Office, which shares a records system with Park City Police, had no reports or calls involving Weinstein or McGowan in the past 30 years, sheriff’s spokesman Lt. Andrew Wright said.

The Times reported Weinstein’s settlement with McGowan included provisions about speaking about the case in the future.

But McGowan appeared emboldened Thursday to describe more outright her past experience with Weinstein. Shortly before a series a tweets addressed to Amazon chief Jeff Bezos, McGowan tweeted a woman warrior picture with a “Rosearmy” hashtag and stated “It’s on.”

“I told the head of your studio that HW raped me,” said McGowan in tweets directed to Bezos. “Over and Over I said it. He said it hadn’t been proven. I said I was the proof.”

In subsequent tweets, McGowan appeared to suggest that Amazon Studios, which is overseen by Roy Price, previously dropped a project penned by McGowan after she insisted Weinstein not be involved.

Representatives for Amazon did not immediately comment Thursday.

The 44-year-old McGowan has emerged as one of the most vocal in Hollywood about sexual abuse and harassment in the industry. She has pushed for the remaining board members of The Weinstein Co. to resign in the wake of the allegations against Weinstein. She also this week called Ben Affleck “a liar” on Twitter, suggesting the actor knew about Weinstein’s conduct. (She and Affleck co-starred in 1997 “Going All the Way” and 1998’s “Phantoms.”)

Representatives for Affleck did not respond to messages regarding that allegation.

Considering McGowan’s stature as a central figure in the Weinstein saga, Twitter sparked an outcry across social media when it temporarily suspended McGowan from its service. The ban was lifted Thursday afternoon but not before a storm of criticism from Jessica Chastain, Anthony Bourdain and many others.

Twitter said Thursday that it suspended McGowan’s account because she tweeted a private phone number, a practice it said violated its service terms. The company said it will “be clearer about these policies and decisions in the future.”

Jailed mom ‘devastated’ to learn son was vaccinated

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/10/11/jailed-mom-devastated-learn-son-vaccinated/756087001/

 

DETROIT — A 9-year-old boy at the center of vaccine dispute between his divorced parents received four immunizations this week, according to court testimony Wednesday.

The boy’s mother, Rebecca Bredow, 40, of Ferndale, opposed the shots and served five days in jail for refusing a judge’s order to get them. The boy’s father, James Horne, wanted his son vaccinated and had them administered on Monday, when he had custody of the child.

Through his attorney, Benton Richardson, Horne declined comment after the court hearing.

Bredow fought back tears as she discussed her jail stint and the rulings today.

“It was the worst five days of my life, except for the fact that I just found out that he was vaccinated and I’m not going to get him back today,” Bredow said. “It’s been a rough few days to say the least.”

Bredow and Horne separated before the boy was born in 2008, and since then, Bredow has had physical custody. Horne has taken his son on alternate weekends.

More: Another way for anti-vaxxers to skip shots for schoolkids: A doctor’s note

More: Study: Teens today safer, healthier in many ways

On Wednesday, Oakland County Circuit Judge Karen McDonald also approved a recommendation from a court referee to have the parents split physical custody 50-50. McDonald gave Bredow’s attorney, Steven Vitale, 21 days to object to the change, which Vitale said he will do.

“She’s devastated,” Vitale said.

Late week, McDonald took the unusual step of finding Bredow in contempt of court for refusing an earlier order to vaccinate her son. McDonald had made her intentions clear at a hearing the week before.

“You have seven days to get your child vaccinated,” McDonald told Bredow Sept. 27. “If not, you will appear here Wednesday and if you have not, I’ll send you to jail. Let me say it one more time, you have seven days. It’s ridiculous. Don’t make me do that.”

Bredow said she couldn’t bring herself to have the child immunized. McDonald said Bredow had consented to the shots in court pleadings in November 2016. Her refusal to do so amounted to contempt of court, McDonald ruled.

Vitale said that those pleadings, filed by a previous attorney, were made in error and Bredow never intended to consent to vaccinations. Bredow, citing religious objections to vaccinations, has avoided giving them to the boy since he was born.

Vitale said that Horne never questioned Bredow’s decisions to not vaccinate the boy until recently.

The case is the second one this week in McDonald’s court where divorced parents disagree on whether or not to vaccinate their child.

In a separate case, Lori Matheson and her ex-husband, Michael Schmitt, are arguing in front of McDonald on whether or not to vaccinate their 2-year-old daughter. Matheson testified on Tuesday that she objects to vaccines on both religious and medical grounds.