The Largest Ethnic Cleansing in History

http://www.renegadetribune.com/largest-ethnic-cleansing-history/

 

From Faces of Ancient Europe

Don’t mind the five or more million Germans. Stalin will see to them. You will not have trouble with them: they will cease to exist.” – Winston Churchill

In December 1944 Winston Churchill announced to a startled House of Commons that the Allies had decided to carry out the largest forced population transfer — or what is nowadays referred to as “ethnic cleansing” — in human history. A crime so great, so cruel, and so heinous, that none in the entire span of human history can equal it. The gates of hell were opened up. It is the ghastly truth of the orchestrated plundering, mass rape, mass murder, and subjugation of the German people in the latter days and aftermath of World War Two, which continues to this day.

As a result of the Second World War, an estimated 14 million ethnic Germans were stripped of their citizenship, land and property, and expelled from their ancestral lands in Eastern Europe, mostly lands formerly part of Germany that were stolen at the Versailles treaty following World War One. 14 million Germans were expelled from their homes in Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary and other Eastern European countries after the war. Only 12 million were able to get to Germany alive. The tragedy of the expulsion of the German civilian population is hardly widely known except amongst Germans and historians. Seven to eight million Germans were expelled from parts of Poland that were actually German land ceded to Poland following WW1. Three million were expelled from portions of Czechoslovakia, primarily the Sudetenland. Some two million ethnic Germans living inside the Soviet Union were expelled, many to Siberian gulags. Around half a million from Hungary, 300,000 from Romania, and smaller numbers from Yugoslavia and other areas were also expelled. It is estimated that at least 2 million of those Germans were murdered or otherwise died as a result of these expulsions, with some estimates running as high as 6 million killed.

Since the end of the war about 3,000,000 people, mostly women and children and overaged men, have been killed in eastern Germany and south-eastern Europe; about 15,000,000 people have been deported or had to flee from their homesteads and are on the road. About 25 per cent of these people, over 3,000,000 have died. About 4,000,000 men and women have been deported to eastern Europe and Russia as slaves. It seems that the elimination of the German population of eastern Europe – at least 15,000,000 people – was planned in accordance with decisions made at Yalta.” ~ Senator Homer Capehart in a speech before U.S. Senate, Feb. 5, 1946.

The expulsion of Germans from Eastern Europe was accompanied by large-scale organized violence, including the confiscation of property, placement in concentration camps and deportation – despite the fact that in August 1945, the Statute of the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg declared deportation of peoples a crime against humanity.

In many cases Ethnic Germans being forcibly expelled were ordered on to trains, some packed with 80 people crammed into each cattle car without adequate (or, occasionally, any) food, water or heating, to be shipped to occupied Germany. After the Soviet Army moved out of Czechoslovakia, the Czech Army and civilians began the mass murder and expulsion of the 3 million ethnic Germans living mostly in northern and western Czechoslovakia. This was sanctioned by the Czech President and government, who openly called for the “liquidation” of the German population from Czechoslovakia. Thousands of Germans attempting to flee to the German border were dragged from trains and convoys and shot by the side of the road, and buried in mass graves.

The largest scale expulsion of the Germans occurred in Poland. By the end of the war millions Germans were expelled from the territory of this country. They were mostly concentrated in German territory granted to Poland in 1945: in Silesia (1.6 million people), Pomerania (1.8 million) and East Brandenburg (600 thousand), as well as in areas densely populated historically by Germans in Poland (about 400 thousand). Also, more than two million Germans living in East Prussia came under Soviet control. In his comprehensive and dispassionate work Deutscher Exodus (Seewald Verlag), Gerhard Ziemer writes:

According to a very painstaking calculation of the Federal Statistical Office in Wiesbaden, the German civilian population lost 2,280,000 members to flight, expulsion and deportation. These people were shot or beaten to death or died of hunger and exhaustion in the labor camps of the deportation process in the East.”

Ziemer states:

The number of victims of the expulsion never impacted on public awareness in the East or West. Even in Germany only a small minority is aware of it. It has not become a topic for journalism and the mass media like the victims of Fascism and the persecution of the Jews have.”

The statistics and documentation of these monstrosities have remained unknown. Official German authorities do not mention or publicize them. Was it right to speak of “liberation” and then to eradicate entire population groups? To expel 15 million people from their homes?

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